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UB Medicine Magazine

UB Medicine Magazine


UB Medicine
is published by the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences to inform its alumni, friends and community about the school’s pivotal role in medical education, research and advanced patient care in our region.

The magazine features timely and informative articles about the school’s move downtown to the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus, new faculty and chair recruits, clinical and translational research, advances in patient care, medical education and training, UB’s role in the integration of health care in Buffalo, faculty, alumni, students and residents and trends in health care.

>Read current issue.

School News

Medical students

Alarmed by the steady decline in the number of physicians practicing in Western New York, local physicians and community leaders have created a new organization designed to train and keep more doctors in the area.

Umesh C. Sharma, MD, PhD
9/21/17

Umesh Sharma, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine, has received a five-year, $1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study galectin-3, a protein involved in heart failure.

Fraser J. Sim, PhD
9/21/17

Researchers in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology have developed and successfully tested a method for determining whether promising new multiple sclerosis (MS) treatments in mice could be effective in humans.

Research News

Umesh C. Sharma, MD, PhD
9/21/17

Umesh Sharma, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine, has received a five-year, $1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study galectin-3, a protein involved in heart failure.

Fraser J. Sim, PhD
9/21/17

Researchers in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology have developed and successfully tested a method for determining whether promising new multiple sclerosis (MS) treatments in mice could be effective in humans.

Downtown Campus News

Head shot of Stephanie Anzman-Frasca, assistant professor of pediatrics.
11/2/15

Imagine a kids’ menu with no French fries or soda that offers healthy entrees. This is the type of menu that an East coast restaurant chain introduced to encourage healthier eating. After its introduction, orders of healthier children’s items increased.  

Rendering of the new medical school building.
3/22/16

Representatives including UB President Satish K. Tripathi and New York State Gov. Andrew Cuomo gathered for the traditional topping out ceremony.

Student, Faculty and Alumni Highlights

Medical students

Alarmed by the steady decline in the number of physicians practicing in Western New York, local physicians and community leaders have created a new organization designed to train and keep more doctors in the area.

Jean Wactawski-Wende, PhD ’89, professor of epidemiology and environmental health, and interim dean of the UB School of Public Health and Health Professions since July 2014, has been appointed dean of the school after a national search.

8/31/17

Fourteen faculty members with varied research and clinical expertise have joined the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences over the past several months.

6/5/17

Twenty-nine faculty members with varied research and clinical expertise have joined the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences over the past several months.

In the Media

9/19/17
Researchers at Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences have identified a new way to predict which Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVR) patients may be at higher risk for hospital readmission. The article appears in “Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team.” Aishwarya Bhardwaj, MD, internal medicine resident, is first author. Tharmathai Ramanan, MD, clinical cardiovascular disease fellow, is first co-author. Vijay S. Iyer, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine, is principal investigator.
8/30/17
Bruce R. Troen, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, and Kenneth L. Seldeen, PhD, research assistant professor of medicine, have concluded a preclinical study that showed that brief periods of intense physical activity can be safely administered at an advanced age, and that this kind of activity has the potential to reverse frailty. “We know that being frail or being at risk for becoming frail puts people at increased risk of dying and comorbidity,” Troen said. “These results show that it’s possible that high-intensity interval training can help enhance quality of life and capacity to be healthy.”