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UB Medicine Magazine

UB Medicine Magazine


UB Medicine
is published by the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences to inform its alumni, friends and community about the school’s pivotal role in medical education, research and advanced patient care in our region.

The magazine features timely and informative articles about the school’s move downtown to the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus, new faculty and chair recruits, clinical and translational research, advances in patient care, medical education and training, UB’s role in the integration of health care in Buffalo, faculty, alumni, students and residents and trends in health care.

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School News

Medical students

Alarmed by the steady decline in the number of physicians practicing in Western New York, local physicians and community leaders have created a new organization designed to train and keep more doctors in the area.

4/21/17

The University at Buffalo’s Richard Sarkin Medical Emeritus Faculty Chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) has inducted 43 exemplary medical students, residents, fellows and faculty members for 2017.

Michael Levitt, Nobel prize winner, standing with arms folded
4/21/17

On May 2, Michael Levitt, a Stanford University School of Medicine biophysicist and professor of structural biology,will give the O.P. Jones Lecture at the University at Buffalo at 3:30 p.m. in Butler Auditorium, 150 Farber Hall, on UB’s South Campus.

Research News

Yijun Sun, PhD
4/20/17

Yijun Sun, PhD, assistant professor of microbiology and immunology, has been awarded a three-year $973,000 grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to develop advanced algorithms to address computational challenges in microbiome research.

Stanley Schwartz
4/6/17

Stanley A. Schwartz, MD, PhD, UB Distinguished Professor of medicine, pediatrics and microbiology and immunology, has received a $749,000 grant from Kaleida Health to investigate the feasibility of targeting and treating metastasized prostate cancer with nanoparticles.

Downtown Campus News

Head shot of Stephanie Anzman-Frasca, assistant professor of pediatrics.
11/2/15

Imagine a kids’ menu with no French fries or soda that offers healthy entrees. This is the type of menu that an East coast restaurant chain introduced to encourage healthier eating. After its introduction, orders of healthier children’s items increased.  

Rendering of the new medical school building.
3/22/16

Representatives including UB President Satish K. Tripathi and New York State Gov. Andrew Cuomo gathered for the traditional topping out ceremony.

Student, Faculty and Alumni Highlights

Medical students

Alarmed by the steady decline in the number of physicians practicing in Western New York, local physicians and community leaders have created a new organization designed to train and keep more doctors in the area.

Jean Wactawski-Wende, PhD ’89, professor of epidemiology and environmental health, and interim dean of the UB School of Public Health and Health Professions since July 2014, has been appointed dean of the school after a national search.

2/17/17

Twelve faculty members with varied research and clinical expertise have joined the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences over the past several months.

12/20/16

Twenty-six faculty with varied research and clinical expertise — including two division chiefs and an associate dean for medical curriculum — have joined the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences over the past several months.

In the Media

4/20/17
Stephanie Anzman-Frasca, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics, has conducted research that surveyed parents and children dining at participating restaurants, as well as executives of restaurant chains, to learn more about healthy children’s meals. “Our research can inform the development and implementation of efforts to make healthier choices easier for families in quick- or full-service restaurant settings, an important goal given the regularity with which children consume meals from restaurants,” she said.
4/20/17
Research has shown that poor eating habits can start at birth, according to Xiaozhong Wen, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics. “Dietary patterns are harder to change later if you ignore the first year, a critical period for the development of taste preferences and the establishment of eating habits,” he said.