Faculty Profiles

Scott, Doyle
Doyle, Scott, PhDAssistant Professor
Email: scottdoy@buffalo.edu
Phone: 716-829-2005

Specialty/Research Focus:
Biomedical Image Analysis; Biomedical Imaging; Digital Pathology; Image Analysis; Machine Learning; Quantitative Histology; Bioinformatics

Research Summary:
Our group specializes in building quantitative image and data analysis algorithms for biomedical datasets. For the past 9 years, I have been developing computerized methods to quantify and analyze large medical imaging datasets. These methods include data processing, object detection / segmentation, feature extraction and selection, dimensionality reduction, and classification (supervised and unsupervised). I strongly believe in translating academic research into real-world products and services. To that end, along with my colleagues, I have worked at a start-up company to bring my work into the marketplace -- an experience that has given me great insight into the business side of academia. This experience broadened my understanding of how basic research is translated into a profitable enterprise, and I believe these lessons have made me a better engineer. I am currently working as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pathology & Anatomical Sciences at the University at Buffalo, where I am focused on building a teaching and research program for quantitative modeling of anatomy and cell biology. This program will introduce students of both medicine and engineering to pattern classification approaches developed in recent years, applying them to real-world clinical problems.

Pinaki, Sarder
Sarder, Pinaki, PhDAssistant Professor
Email: pinakisa@buffalo.edu
Phone: (716) 829-2265

Specialty/Research Focus:
Biomedical Image Analysis; Biomedical Imaging; Bioinformatics

Research Summary:
I have worked in three distinct research domains in my career: analytical statistical signal processing, experimental molecular imaging, and genomic data analysis. I collaborate with researchers from both academia and industry in multiple disciplines, including theoretical and applied physics, biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology, and medicine. This multidisciplinary, cross-sector experience has given me unique skills and tools for successfully executing the goals of my laboratory. The major projects in my laboratory are focused on quantitative biomedical image processing and analysis. I am also interested in developing end-user biomedical software. This work will build on my previous research and expand into translational research that will directly support human health. At present, major projects in our lab are centered on developing computational methods to analyze histopathological images of the heterogeneous renal microscopic architecture. Using the developed computational tools, we are expecting to unearth early digital biomarkers of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Tools derived in our projects will allow modeling of clinical outcomes, such as end-stage renal disease and death, for DN patients and will also provide clinicians with invaluable information about their patient's expected disease trajectory and progression. Our laboratory is woven strongly into the Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences' innovative research and teaching directions that integrate anatomy, pathology, and data analysis. Departmental faculty members participate in both graduate biomedical and medical programs; as part of that effort, I seek motivated trainees/students to work in my research group to focus on our novel research direction. I believe that teaching and research greatly complement each other, and I emphasize equally teaching in the classroom and guiding students in my research lab.