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Media Coverage

8/16/17
The Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences has received a $2.5 million National Library of Medicine grant to train new research leaders in the field of biomedical informatics. Peter L. Elkin, MD, professor and chair of biomedical informatics and director of the new training program, said the grant “puts the department at the forefront of this rapidly changing field.”
8/15/17
A new study by Stephanie Anzman-Frasca, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics, has shown that placemats can be used to encourage children to eat healthier food in restaurants. "Making healthy options appealing and easy to choose offers the potential to increase children's acceptance of them in restaurants,” she said.
8/15/17
A new study has found that heart failure patients who took aspirin daily were not at higher risk of being hospitalized for, or dying from, heart failure. Susan Graham, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, who worked on the study, said heart patients — and older adults in general — are often taking many prescription drugs at any given time. “That speaks to the importance of studying potential drug interactions,” she said. “We have to stay on our toes to make sure that we’re doing the right thing.”
8/15/17
Bruce R. Troen, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, and Kenneth L. Seldeen, PhD, research assistant professor of medicine, have concluded a preclinical study that showed that brief periods of intense physical activity can be safely administered at an advanced age, and that this kind of activity has the potential to reverse frailty. “We know that being frail or being at risk for becoming frail puts people at increased risk of dying and comorbidity,” Troen said. “These results show that it’s possible that high-intensity interval training can help enhance quality of life and capacity to be healthy.”
8/15/17
A new study has identified a gene that plays a central role in either protecting from stress or contributing to depression, depending on its level of activity in a part of the brain associated with motivation, pleasure and reward-seeking. David Dietz, PhD, associate professor and interim chair of pharmacology and toxicology, said little was known previously about the biological basis of depression in the brain. “We’re starting to really get an idea of what does the depressed brain look like,” he said. “When you put the whole puzzle together, you see where the problem is…. For the first time this is one of those bigger pieces you can slide into the jigsaw puzzle.”
8/11/17
An article reports on research being conducted by Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, and two student researchers to find out if telemedicine can improve hepatitis C treatment for patients who take methadone and, if so, how it can work best. “This is a population that not only has been excluded from medical care but also from research,” Talal said.
8/11/17
An article on the opioid epidemic in Western New York interviews Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine and vice chair of addiction medicine, who said that when Prescription Monitoring Programs started to take effect, a vast population of addicts began turning to heroin. “When doctors stopped prescribing licit drugs to these patients, they turned to the illicit market where diverted prescription drugs and highly potent illegal drugs were becoming more available at lower costs,” he said.
8/9/17
Umesh Sharma, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine, has received a grant of $1 million from the National Institutes of Health to continue work on a study involving heart failure after a heart attack.
8/4/17
An article about the future of health care in Western New York notes local health institutions and the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences have been working together to invest in facilities and make the local health care system more physician-friendly.
7/31/17
Timothy F. Murphy, MD, PHD, senior associate dean of clinical and translational research, authored a blog post on the American Federation of Teachers website about how Washington’s anti-science sentiment will hurt research funding for NIH. He writes: “…what a loss. Not only are we losing research dollars and the life-changing science they can fund, we are losing the best and brightest who could come up with as yet unimaginable solutions to some of our thorniest biomedical challenges.”
7/31/17
A new study has that found that one in three in the American adult population used some form of prescription painkiller in 2015. “We’ve all known for some time that there's been a problem with opiates and there’'s been this increase in the number of opiate prescriptions. But the sheer number of people who are receiving prescriptions in 2015, which this study is based on, was staggering and very surprising,” said Kenneth E. Leonard, PhD, professor of psychiatry and director of UB’s Research Institute on Addictions.
7/28/17
Roughly 24,000 terra cotta panels have been installed so far on the new Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences building downtown, with nearly 4,000 more to go.
7/28/17
CGTV News, an international news outlets with an audience of 1.2 billion people around the world, interviews Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, about World Hepatitis Day and research about the disease. “I think the progress in treatment has really been phenomenal,” he said. “The new therapies for hepatitis C have really been revolutionary, resulting in one pill once a day for the vast majority of patients, much shorter treatment duration, much easier to take and minimal side effects.”
7/27/17
A team of UB medical doctors led by Leslie J. Bisson, MD, June A. and Eugene R. Mindell, MD, Professor and chair of orthopaedics, have published a study that challenges a surgical practice used for decades during arthroscopic knee surgery. The study showed that clipping or removing loose cartilage after knee surgery for meniscal tears does not benefit the patient. “Those with less surgery got better faster in comparison with the people we did more surgery on,” he said.
7/26/17
A story on a study that found that 110 of 111 deceased former NFL players had chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, interviews John J. Leddy, MD, clinical professor of orthopaedics and medical director of the UBMD Concussion Management Clinic. “Their findings can suggest there’s a problem but do not prove it, and suggest that it’s probably an issue for a certain group of people who play contact sports but we don’t know who they are,” he said.