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Media Coverage

10/17/17
A new book co-edited by Mulchand S. Patel, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of biochemistry, and colleagues explores in detail the many fetal and immediate postnatal nutritional influences on adult health. "Our animal studies have shown that overfeeding, or the increased intake of carbohydrate-derived calories during the immediate postnatal period, can reprogram an individual's metabolism, creating negative health outcomes later in life," he said.
10/2/17
UB has established a website to assist in the transition of the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences to the new building located in downtown Buffalo. The website includes information about the impact on the community, on research and on patient care, as well as the impact on medical education at UB.
9/28/17
A new state grant will help UB train physicians and nurses on how to medically treat people who are addicted to opioids. “Buprenorphine helps alleviate the craving people who are addicted to opiates feel,” said Kenneth E. Leonard, PhD, professor of psychiatry and director of UB’s Research Institute on Addictions. “It must be part of a full set of psychological and social interventions, ideally with professionals at chemical dependency treatment centers.”
9/27/17
An article about concussion and what happens when an individual has a brain injury interviews John J. Leddy, MD, clinical professor of orthopaedics and medical director of UB’s Concussion Management Clinic, who said the best way of determining whether a person has a concussion is a checklist of symptoms. “[There] are the physical signs on examination that I look for in everybody who I see with a concussion,” he said. “How their eyes are working and what their balance is like.”
9/25/17
Research by Paresh Dandona, MD, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of medicine and chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism, shows that a majority of patients with type 1 diabetes did significantly better at controlling blood sugar when they used insulin and a medicine for type 2 diabetes. “It can save a lot of lives,” he said. “It can reduce complications like eye disease, blindness, kidney disease and failure. Type 1 is really a disaster and, overall, not a disease you want to have.”
9/22/17
Research by Paresh Dandona, MD, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of medicine and chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism, shows that patients with type 1 diabetes who were treated with a type 2 diabetes drug had a significant decline in their blood sugar levels. “There remains a high unmet medical need in helping treat the millions of patients living with type 1 diabetes while managing the complications associated with the disease,” he said. “It is critical that we continue to advance clinical research with newer and novel therapies.”
9/21/17
A new book co-edited by Mulchand S. Patel, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of biochemistry, and colleagues explores in detail the many fetal and immediate postnatal nutritional influences on adult health. “Our animal studies have shown that overfeeding, or the increased intake of carbohydrate-derived calories during the immediate postnatal period, can reprogram an individual’s metabolism, creating negative health outcomes later in life,” he said.  
9/19/17
Researchers at Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences have identified a new way to predict which Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVR) patients may be at higher risk for hospital readmission. The article appears in “Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team.” Aishwarya Bhardwaj, MD, internal medicine resident, is first author. Tharmathai Ramanan, MD, clinical cardiovascular disease fellow, is first co-author. Vijay S. Iyer, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine, is principal investigator.
9/15/17
David W. Hojnacki, MD, assistant professor of neurology, received the Stephen H. Kelly Award as a “Professional on the Move” at the “Champions on the Move” event sponsored by the Upstate Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.
9/15/17
Health-care providers are adding more functions to their patient portals to improve the efficiency of their practices as well as patient outcomes. Peter Winkelstein, MD, MBA, executive director of UB’s Institute for Healthcare Informatics, said many physicians aren’t yet comfortable enabling such advanced functions because they feel they’re ceding too much control to the patients.
9/14/17
A story about a program offered to local emergency room physicians to train them how to identify patients who could benefit from a prescription for buprenorphine after they leave the ER interviews Robert F. McCormack, MD, professor and chair of emergency medicine. “We’re seeing a large number of people coming in with opioid-related problems. Most being overdose that they present to the emergency department,” he said.
9/13/17
An article about an outbreak of human Campylobacter infections that have been linked to puppies sold through a national pet store chain quotes Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of infectious diseases. Raw milk is also a potential source of the infection, which is why it’s better to drink pasteurized milk, he said.
9/8/17
An article on the emergence of hypervirulent, multidrug-resistant and highly transmissible strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae quotes Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of infectious diseases. "In this case it looks like the virulence factors went from the hypervirulent strains into an extensively drug-resistant strain," he said. "This is exactly what we were concerned about, and we thought would have a high likelihood of coming to fruition."
8/30/17
Bruce R. Troen, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, and Kenneth L. Seldeen, PhD, research assistant professor of medicine, have concluded a preclinical study that showed that brief periods of intense physical activity can be safely administered at an advanced age, and that this kind of activity has the potential to reverse frailty. “We know that being frail or being at risk for becoming frail puts people at increased risk of dying and comorbidity,” Troen said. “These results show that it’s possible that high-intensity interval training can help enhance quality of life and capacity to be healthy.”
8/30/17
The Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences has received a $2.5 million National Library of Medicine grant to train new research leaders in the field of biomedical informatics. Peter L. Elkin, MD, professor and chair of biomedical informatics and director of the new training program, said the grant “puts the department at the forefront of this rapidly changing field.”