Media Coverage

12/6/17
A front-page article reports on the new downtown home of the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, which will be dedicated on Dec. 12 and open to students on Jan. 8. The article quotes Michael E. Cain, MD, vice president for health sciences and dean of the Jacobs School. “Hundreds of people discussed and gave ideas about what the medical school should look like, and what the research and education venues should be and how they should be configured,” Cain said. 
12/6/17
Research by Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, suggests that a now-extinct Chinese otter that roamed lakes or swamps 6 million years ago was almost as large as a wolf and had jawbones capable of crushing large shells, as well as birds and mammals, making it a key predator in its ecosystem. “We don’t know for sure, but we think that this otter was more of a top predator than living species of otters are,” Tseng says. “Our findings imply that Siamogale could crush much harder and larger prey than any living otter can.”
12/6/17
The Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences has begun its move downtown, which is being done in several phases. “It’s a thoughtful, coordinated move,” said Michael E. Cain, MD, vice president of health sciences and dean of the medical school. “We designed this move to take several months on purpose. It’s a complex move and we can’t interrupt classes once they’ve started.”
12/3/17
An opinion piece by Brian Clemency, DO, associate professor of emergency medicine, looks at the new ways emergency medical technicians and paramedics are being taught to treat cardiac arrest in order to improve survival rates. “Our providers immediately perform life-saving interventions rather than delay or hinder the delivery of those interventions by moving the patient. Most importantly, this has enabled our providers to center resuscitative efforts around the delivery of high-quality, uninterrupted chest compressions and prompt defibrillation,” he writes.
12/1/17
Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine, and vice chair of addiction medicine, was interviewed for a story about the opioid crisis and a new indictment against a local pain management physician. He said overprescribing medications is partly to blame for the opioid epidemic. “The promotion of drugs to physicians by pharmaceutical companies or the representatives that encourage physicians to overprescribe is what got us into this mess,” Blondell said.
12/1/17
Research led by Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, suggests that a now-extinct Chinese otter that roamed lakes or swamps was almost as large as a wolf and had jawbones capable of crushing large shells, as well as birds and mammals, making it a key predator in its ecosystem. The researchers developed a computer model to test their guess that jaw strength would depend on what foods the species prefers. "You don't need to chew fish, you just sort of bite on it and swallow," Tseng said.
12/1/17
Michal K. Stachowiak, PhD, professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, is asked about mini-brains and the scientific debate over the ethics of implanting human organoid tissue into the brains of mice. He said if organoids grow closer to the size of full human brains, even the size of an infant’s brain, they’d start to require oxygen and nutrients to keep themselves going. But once you’ve gone from a tiny “brain in a dish” to a larger organ with more and more of the stuff inside our skulls, it’s harder not to wonder if some lines should be drawn, he added.
12/1/17
Steven L. Dubovsky, MD, professor and chair of psychiatry, talks about the mass shootings occurring around the country and the growing feelings of fear and loss that are affecting people as a result. He said people can empower themselves by asking what things they can actively do to keep themselves and their communities safe. “That way, you won’t feel like you’re passively waiting,” he said. “You will feel less anxious and more in control.”
11/30/17
An article in Business First reports UB will officially open its new Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences building on Dec. 12 during a ceremony that is expected to include state and local dignitaries, and includes a slideshow featuring the building. The article notes that the 628,000-square-foot, $375 million facility represents a return downtown after 64 years on the South Campus, and that the finishing touches are being put on the interior and students will begin taking classes there in January.
11/24/17
An article about two researchers at Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute who left for full-time jobs in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences looks at the relationship between the two organizations and quotes Michael E. Cain, MD, vice president for health sciences and dean of the Jacobs School. “As we transition to our new home on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus, we anticipate the rich, new opportunities and life-saving innovations that will result from our proximity to HWI and our other research partners downtown,” he said. 
11/16/17
The University at Buffalo was given the green light to acquire the property on which its new $375 million Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences building now sits. Classes in the new medical school start in January.
11/14/17
Nancy H. Nielsen, MD, PhD, senior associate dean for health policy, says that law enforcement has had a “chilling effect”on doctors who are caught between fighting opioid abuse and adding services to help those patients in the wake of new federal charges against a local pain-management physician. ‘We have to make sure that law enforcement understands that good people are trying to do good work,” she said. “We know that there are gaps and we know that we need more multidisciplinary centers across the state.”
11/14/17
Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, MD, professor of neurology, is the principal investigator of clinical trials exploring potential therapeutic applications of cannabinoids in progressive multiple sclerosis. Weinstock-Guttman is executive director of the New York State Multiple Sclerosis Consortium.
11/9/17
Norma J. Nowak, PhD, professor of biochemistry and executive director of UB’s New York State Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics and Life Sciences, is a member of the search committee tasked with hiring a replacement for John Gavigan, who is stepping down as executive director of 43North.
11/9/17
An article interviews a nurse who has worked at Children’s Hospital for 45 years about the medical milestones that have accompanied her career, including the development of Infasurf, created at an Amherst startup company led by Edmund A. Egan, II, MD, professor of pediatrics.