Media Coverage

8/23/18
Tianeptine is an unapproved antidepressant drug that is believed to have caused an increase in calls to U.S. poison centers. Raphael J. Leo, MD, associate professor of psychiatry, recently published a case study on the drug that noted that blogs advocate use of amounts greater than the recommended daily antidepressant dose in order to achieve “opioid-like effects.” Some people who seek out tianeptine are searching for “a supplement to enhance mood and cognitive function,” he said, adding that he does not think all purchasers “necessarily think of it as an opiate.”
8/21/18
New UB research has shown that, for patients with multiple sclerosis, the disappearance of lesions into the cerebrospinal fluid is a better indicator of who will develop disability than the appearance or expansion of the lesions, and quotes Robert Zivadinov, professor of neurology. “Using the appearance of new brain lesions and the enlargement of existing ones as the indicator of disease progression, there was no sign of who would develop disability during five or 10 years of follow-up, but when we used the amount of brain lesion volume that had atrophied, we could predict within the first six months who would develop disability progression over long-term follow-up,” said Zivadinov, who serves as director of the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center (BNAC) in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and directs the Center for Biomedical Imaging at UB’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI).
8/17/18
An article about a local couple who in the past two years has seen three of their four children return to Buffalo to live features John B. Ortolani, MD, assistant professor of surgery, who attended the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, then moved to Roanoke, Virginia, and Shreveport, Louisiana, before returning to Buffalo in 2017.
8/16/18
Empire Genomics, the biotechnology company co-founded in 2006 by Norma J. Nowak, PhD, professor of biochemistry and executive director of UB’s New York State Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics and Life Sciences, will move from downtown Buffalo to new offices in Amherst.
8/15/18
Research by Fraser J. Sim, PhD, associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology has found that a receptor called muscarinic type 3 (M3R), a key regulator of the remyelination process, is a promising drug target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. “This work establishes that M3R has a functional role and if blocked, could improve myelin repair,” he said. “It better positions the field for clinical trials that will be aimed at blocking these receptors in MS patients.”
8/15/18
Research by Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, has found that a new, highly accurate MRI technique can monitor iron levels in the brains of multiple sclerosis patients, helping to identify those at a higher risk for developing physical disability.
8/7/18
An article about the singer Demi Lovato, who was hospitalized recently for an apparent drug overdose, and the enduring struggle of addiction and relapse, interviews Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine and vice chair of addiction medicine, who said a number of risk factors make relapses perilous, but the major culprit is often losing tolerance. “When a relapse occurs, someone may take a dose that they think is going to be effective — and it may even be half of what they were taking before — but because they’ve lost their tolerance, those tend to be lethal,” he said.
8/2/18
An article about a major study presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Chicago shows an Associated Press file photo of a human brain with Alzheimer’s disease on display at the Museum of Neuroanatomy in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.
8/1/18
An article on Spectroscopy Now reports on research by Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, that found that a new, highly accurate MRI technique can monitor iron levels in the brains of multiple sclerosis patients, helping to identify those at a higher risk for developing physical disability. “Iron depletion or increase in several structures of the brain is an independent predictor of disability related to MS,” said Zivadinov, who is also director of the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center (BNAC) and directs the Center for Biomedical Imaging at UB’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI).
8/1/18
Research by Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of infectious diseases, investigated the hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae, a rare but increasingly common strain of the pathogen that can infect completely healthy people, is resistant to all antibiotics and can cause blindness in one day and flesh-eating infections, brain abscesses and death in just a few days. “What’s increasingly concerning is the growing number of reports that describe strains of hypervirulent K. pneumoniae that are antimicrobial resistant,” he said. “A bug that's both hypervirulent and challenging to treat is a bad combination.”
8/1/18
A Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences’ animal study may be one of the first to examine how low levels of vitamin D affect physical performance over the long term. Senior author on the study is Bruce R. Troen, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine. First author is Kenneth L. Seldeen, PhD, research assistant professor of medicine, who said, “The take-home message of this study is that while having low serum vitamin D for a month or even a year or two may not matter for a person, yet over several decades it may have clinical ramifications.”
8/1/18
Research by Jun Xia, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, and Jonathan F. Lovell, PhD, associate professor of biomedical engineering, a joint program of the UB School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, shows that barley is an ideal and safe contrast agent for diagnosing swallowing disorders. “It’s really incredible. Here you have this common grain — it has been grown all over the world for thousands of years, and used to make tea, bread, beer — and we’re just now finding another use for it as a contrast agent for medical imaging,” Xia said. 
7/28/18
An article in the Toledo Blade about the expansion of health care network ProMedica — which recently purchased the nation’s second-largest long-term care provider — quotes Nancy H. Nielsen, MD, PhD, senior associate dean for health care policy in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, who said that changes in how the government reimburses both acute care and skilled nursing facilities is leading to some radical change in the industry. “Across the country, we are seeing mergers, acquisitions and alliances that formerly seemed improbable or unnecessary,” Nielsen said. “Economic pressures, hastened by changes in payment policies to ‘pay for value,’ are driving this movement, even when it is portrayed in altruistic terms.”
7/27/18
While some issues are part of the normal aging process, geriatric syndromes aren’t, according to Anjeet K. Saini, MD, assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine. “When we get older, we’re at greater risk for disability that interfere with activities of daily living,” she said. “In geriatrics, activities of daily living are the core principles we need to survive. Once ADLs are decreased, we have more disabilities.”
7/25/18
An article on Demi Lovato’s hospitalization after an apparent drug overdose mentions a quote earlier provided on an unrelated story by Kenneth E. Leonard, PhD, research professor of psychiatry and director of UB’s Research Institute on Addictions. “The longer a person is sober, the better his or her chances of staying away from drugs permanently,” Leonard said.