Media Coverage

6/24/20
Articles report on a study led by Teresa Quattrin, MD, UB Distinguished Professor of pediatrics and senior associate dean for research integration. The research found that golimumab, an anti-tumor-necrosis-factor drug, helped preserve the ability to make insulin (endogenous insulin) in newly diagnosed children and young adults with Type 1 diabetes.
6/24/20
Medical XPress reported on research by the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and the University of Alabama at Birmingham that reveals new information about the possible cause of retinitis pigmentosa, a condition that underlies a rare form of irreversible blindness in young children. The Jacobs School team is led by Steven J. Fliesler, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and the Meyer H. Riwchun Endowed Chair Professor of ophthalmology.
6/24/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, is quoted in a report on the rise in COVID-19 infections in people under age 50 over the past three weeks. “I think it has to do in part with the opening,” said Russo. “Now they have the ability to go to bars and restaurants and indoor conditions where you’re more likely to get infected.”
6/23/20
One-third of a cohort of men with Type 2 diabetes and hypogonadism who received testosterone undecanoate therapy experienced a sustained remission of their diabetes, according to findings from a single-center study. “The message is clear. All people with type 2 diabetes and/or obesity should have their testosterone measured and, if appropriate, be treated with testosterone for hypogonadism,” says Paresh Dandona, MD, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of medicine and chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism.
6/22/20
In a report on the safety of reopening basketball courts in Buffalo, Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, is interviewed. “I think the pluses are that it’s an outdoor activity and we know that the coronavirus is less infectious outside because it gets readily dispersed in a larger air volume,” said Russo, before noting his concerns. “People running up and down the court, breathing heavily, and likely to be in close quarters for a long period of time is gonna certainly increase their risk of getting infected.”
6/22/20
CNN published comments by Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, about how to safely return to work and when workers should wear masks. “Although the risk is greatest when in close proximity to someone, it is still possible to get infected when separation is greater than six feet; mask use will minimize this risk,” he said. The comments are part of CNN’s weekly COVID coverage provided by experts; Russo is now one of CNN’s pool of experts for this weekly feature.
6/20/20
The Buffalo News quotes John A. Sellick Jr., DO, professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases and a hospital epidemiologist for the VA Western New York Healthcare System, in a story on socially distanced seating arrangements the Buffalo Bills are considering, and options for other teams. Sellick said he shares Buffalo Sabres tickets with a group of friends, nearly all of whom are 65 or older, and that none seems certain about when they would feel comfortable attending a game. “Before I would go back in person, I’d have to see that there’s some kind of mitigation involved,” Sellick said. “If they just say, ‘We’re going to fill the arena, come on down,’ then my guess is my Sabres group is going to fall apart because pretty much nobody’s going to want to do that.”
6/20/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, is quoted in a report on the need to take safety precautions while traveling in the summer. “Getting to and from your vacation venue, whether it’s by bus, train or plane, inevitably you’re gonna interact with other individuals, so in that circumstance, it’s critical that you maintain your mask use,” said Russo.
6/19/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, published an article featuring tips on how to stay safe from coronavirus while eating out. “Menus are a bit more problematic, depending on the material. Plastic menus could be disinfected. Disposable menus would be more ideal,” Russo writes. “Remember, even if someone touches a surface that has infectious virus, as long as they don’t touch their mouth, nose or eyes they should be safe. So, when in doubt, wash your hands or use hand sanitizer.” 
6/19/20
In a story on the choice New York health departments have to make between education or enforcement when businesses violate reopening rules during the COVID-19 pandemic, Peter Winkelstein, MD, executive director of the Institute for Healthcare Informatics, is interviewed. “If you’re too lenient, people say it’s not important. If you hammer too hard, you get pushback,” Winkelstein said.
6/17/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, is interviewed for a story that examines asymptomatic transmission of the novel coronavirus in young people. “We know that you can be asymptomatic/pre-symptomatic and spread infection. The question that is unresolved is what portion of secondary cases are a result of this mode of transmission,” Russo said.
6/17/20
Xiaozhong Wen, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics in the Division of Behavioral Medicine, is interviewed for an article on a new study that linked indoor air pollution and heavy metals to child obesity. “Conventionally, obesity research focuses more on diets, physical activity and a sedentary lifestyle,” said Wen, who was not involved in the study. “Usually we only look at one or a few exposures in one study. This one is pretty ambitious.”
6/16/20
Media outlets nationwide published an article by Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, on how to safely protest while staying safe from coronavirus. Russo noted that while being outside is generally safer than inside, several factors specific to protests negate those benefits, such as large crowds in close proximity for a long time, chanting and shouting, which increases respiratory secretions and the lack of personal protective equipment. He concludes: “It’s hard to protest in an absolutely safe fashion, but if everyone was wearing masks and eye protection, that would significantly decrease risk.”
6/16/20
A story in the Buffalo News about Western New York restaurants preparing to reopen for indoor dining notes that a UB team recently adjusted future modeling illustrations to account for various factors, including people wearing face masks. “The face masks are critical, and it’s your job to wear a face mask to protect others,” said Peter Winkelstein, MD, executive director of UB’s Institute for Healthcare Informatics and a clinical professor of pediatrics in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Winkelstein is also chief medical officer of UBMD Physicians’s Group and Kaleida Health.
6/16/20
WGR 550 Sports Radio interviews Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, about Western New York’s phased reopening in light of COVID-19, and preparations for Phase 3. “We’re definitely at the right point to try this. Our cases are at an all-time low since the beginning of this outbreak,” Russo says. He cautions, however, that Phase 1 and 2 were akin to “minor league ball,” whereas now “we’re going to the “big leagues.” He notes that some indoor activities are included in Phase 3, and says people must remain careful. The region is still in the early phases of the pandemic, he says, which means most people are still susceptible to the virus.