Media Coverage

9/12/18
An article reports on research by Caroline E. Bass, PhD, assistant professor of pharmacology and toxicology, that used optogenetics to treat binge drinking in mice. “By stimulating certain dopamine neurons in a precise pattern, resulting in low but prolonged levels of dopamine release, we could prevent the rats from binging. The rats just flat out stopped drinking,” she said.
9/7/18
A story on a dinner held by doctors and students from the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences to talk about health care with community members from Buffalo’s East Side interviews Linda F. Pessar, MD, director of the Center for Medical Humanities and professor emerita of psychiatry. Pessar said that with the population becoming increasingly diverse, it’s important that doctors start listening and adapting. “The entrepreneurial private practitioner practicing at the community in which he or she lives and grew up is a fading idol,” she said. "If we don’t become responsive to community members, we will not practice the medicine we need and hope to practice, and it seems to me that’s the bottom line.”
9/6/18
Brittany L. Steimle, a doctoral candidate in biochemistry, received an award for outstanding poster for her presentation on how proteins transport manganese in the brain at the international “Trace Elements in Biology and Medicine” conference, sponsored by the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology in Tahoe City, California. “Understanding how manganese accumulates into the brain through the blood-brain barrier may serve as a key to designing drug targets for individuals who may have been overexposed to manganese in the environment or in whom manganese metabolism has somehow become dysregulated,” said Steimle, who conducts research in the laboratory of Daniel J. Kosman, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of biochemistry.
9/6/18
Science publications are reporting on research by M. Aleksander Wysocki, a doctoral student in computational cell biology, anatomy and pathology, and Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, that found that the jaw joint bone, the center around which chewing activity literally revolves, appears to have evolved based more on an animal’s size than what it eats. “Still, given how critical the temporomandibular joint is in capturing prey and eating it, these results are very striking,” said Wysocki, first author on the paper originally published in PLoS ONE. “For over a century, it has been assumed that skull shape is closely related to what an animal eats. And now we have found that jaw joint bone structure is related to carnivoran body size, not what the animal is eating.” Tseng is co-author of the piece.
9/6/18
Catholic Health’s CEO Mark Sullivan is taking steps to better understand his new position, including an hour-long meeting with Michael E. Cain, MD, vice president for health sciences and dean of the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, to discuss how Catholic Health can play a greater role with medical students.
8/31/18
An article about the role alcohol consumption can play in a relationship reports a UB study showed that heavy drinking wasn’t the problem in couples, unless only one person was doing the heavy drinking, and quotes Kenneth E. Leonard, PhD, research professor of psychiatry and director of UB’s Research Institute on Addictions. “Our results indicate that it is the difference between the couple’s drinking habits, rather than the drinking itself, that leads to marital dissatisfaction, separation and divorce,” he said.
8/30/18
An article in the Buffalo News told about David Dietz, PhD, associate professor, being appointed chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Dietz has developed a research program focused on how susceptible individuals are to drug abuse and relapse.
8/30/18
Research by M. Aleksander Wysocki, a student in the doctoral program in computational cell biology, anatomy and pathology, and Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, found that the jaw joint bone, the center around which chewing activity literally revolves, appears to have evolved based more on an animal’s size than what it eats.
8/29/18
Endovascular Today featured a question-and-answer interview with Linda M. Harris, MD, professor of surgery and program director of vascular surgery integrated residency and vascular surgery fellowship in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. She told about her tenure as past president of the Eastern Vascular Society, how to improve diversity in the field, mentoring the next generation of vascular surgeons and updates in endovascular techniques and technology. She said: “Working with medical students, residents and fellows at my own institution has allowed me to empower many young physicians. The amazing thing is that some of the best and brightest trainees are often some of the most unassuming and humble people you will ever meet.”
8/29/18
Adnan Siddiqui, MD, PhD, professor and vice chair of neurosurgery, served as moderator for a challenging case presentation in Endovascular Today that dealt with a 54-year-old woman with a history of hypertension presented with left upper extremity weakness and facial droop with a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 12. She had been found by her daughter on the floor and was unable to communicate due to dysarthria and confusion. Experts then weighed in with their opinions.
8/28/18
An opinion piece in the Buffalo News about the “very rare” use of buprenorphine in the emergency room of a California hospital to treat opioid-addicted patients noted that it is not rare in Western New York, where the practice was initiated by Joshua J. Lynch, DO, clinical assistant professor of emergency medicine in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. “Lynch knows that opioid addiction is a chronic disease requiring immediate aggressive treatment and management and therefore initiated a protocol of administering Suboxone at the time of ER treatment. But he didn’t stop there. He enlisted the help of his department chairman and emergency medicine colleagues. Recognizing that access to follow-up care was a problem, he approached local clinics and asked that they hold open appointment times for patients in crisis,” the article notes.
8/27/18
An article co-authored by David Dietz, PhD, associate professor and chair, Craig T. Werner, PhD, a postdoctoral associate, and Jennifer A. Martin, a doctoral student, all in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, tells about high-profile celebrities who have relapsed into addiction and looks at the painful reality of treating the illness. “Addiction — and relapse — are not the result of a lack of effort, but rather the known symptoms of both a medical and psychosocial problem. In this context, relapse is not indicative of a personal failure but rather a systemic one. Our current treatment regimens still too often fail to prevent relapses because they are still struggling to treat the underlying disease,” they write.
8/27/18
A story on WKBW-TV back-to-school tips to help children get a good night’s sleep includes suggestions from M. Jeffery Mador, MD, associate professor of medicine in the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, to make sure they’re well rested and ready for school.
8/24/18
Research by Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, analyzed the fossilized feces of the canine ancestors of dogs and wolves to discover that the extinct species had a jawbone powerful enough to crush the bones of its prey.
8/24/18
Research led by Ruogang Zhao, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, has developed new biotechnology that places lung tissue on electronic chips, allowing researchers to more affordably simulate the progression of pulmonary fibrosis over time and potentially develop new medications.