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Media Coverage

7/25/17
Gil I. Wolfe, MD, professor and Irvin and Rosemary Smith Chair of neurology, talks about myasthenia gravis, a chronic autoimmune neuromuscular disease that often gives people difficulty operating muscles they should be able to control. He said said many people diagnosed with the disease have never heard of it. “In general, people with MG do very well,” he said. “They can hold jobs, they can exercise, they can be active in their family lives.”
7/22/17
An opinion piece by Nancy H. Nielsen, MD, PhD, senior associate dean for health policy, calls on the Senate to set aside partisanship and find real solutions to improving health care for everyone. “What kind of lawmaker chortles with glee as people in need of individual health insurance can’t find it or afford it? Put down your swords and provide a three- to five-year period of insurance predictability while you (and we) sort things out,” she writes. “Then, accept what everyone knows — all have to be in the insurance pool for it to be affordable.”
7/20/17
Research by Abhishek Sawant, a fellow in the Department of Medicine, has showed the benefits of performing percutaneous coronary intervention to clear blocked blood vessels in the hearts in people age 90 and older. “We did show that patients who had lower risk and underwent this procedure actually did very well,” he said.
7/20/17
Buffalo is home to the nation’s first opioid crisis intervention court, which can get users into treatment within hours of their arrest instead of days. The program is funded by a three-year, $300,000 grant from the U.S. Justice Department, which pays for a coordinator and case managers from UB Family Medicine, who enforce curfews, do wellness checks and transport patients.
7/20/17
Bruce R. Troen, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, led a study that used geriatric mice that ran on treadmills to learn whether abbreviated, intense workouts may help people of any age become healthier. “The animals had tolerated the high-intensity interval training well,” despite their advanced ages, he said, noting that interval training has a signature advantage. “You get done so quickly.”
7/13/17
An article about a local 17-year-old with congenital muscular dystrophy and his everyday routine of countering the obstacles posed by the disease interviews Nicholas J. Silvestri, MD, clinical associate professor of neurology and a specialist in neuromuscular disorders. “The absence of a particular protein (merosin) forming the muscle membrane leads to progressive destruction of muscle cells over time which are not able to fully repair themselves,” he said.
7/12/17
A UB study used geriatric mice that ran on treadmills to learn whether abbreviated, intense workouts may help people of any age become healthier. Bruce R. Troen, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, conducted the study. “The animals had tolerated the high-intensity interval training well,” despite their advanced ages, he said, noting that interval training has a signature advantage. “You get done so quickly.”
7/12/17
Robert F. McCormack, MD, professor and chair of emergency medicine, testified before a State Senate Task Force in Buffalo about the heroin and opioid epidemic. “The opioid crisis is a behavioral, medical and societal problem that still needs a lot of resources to fix,” he said.
7/11/17
A global cardiology conference held in Vancouver featured two doctors from the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences: Anne B. Curtis, MD, Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and chair and SUNY Distinguished Professor of medicine, discussed improved care for atrial fibrillation and guidelines involving the condition, and Michael E. Cain, MD, vice president for health sciences and dean of the medical school, chaired a session on cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death, and spoke on new electrocardiographic predictors of sudden cardiac death.
7/10/17
Newly graduated doctors began their medical residencies on July 1. “When there is an issue that arises urgently in the hospital, because they are fast and young and always there, they are often first on the scene,” said Roseanne C. Berger, MD, senior associate dean for graduate medical education, “and they really expand the physician workforce and so they are major contributors.”
7/7/17
Research by Mark R. O’Brian, PhD,  professor and chair of biochemistry, has led to a four-year, $1.28 million grant to study how bacteria mutate to accept iron, and how the organism expels excess iron. "We usually think of evolution taking place over a long period of time, but we're seeing evolution — at least as the ability to use an iron source that it couldn't before — occurring as a single mutation in the cell that we never would have predicted," he said.
7/7/17
The Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences welcomed 190 new physicians at a long white coat ceremony held in the Center for Tomorrow to welcome first-year residents who will begin the next phase of their medical training.
7/7/17
Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine and vice chair of addiction medicine, and Torin J. Finver, MD, clinical instructor of family medicine and program director for the addiction medicine fellowship, were interviewed about a proposal that would send those going through opiate withdrawal home to detoxify. “It is an interesting concept that should be funded. However, it would be important to also collect data to evaluate its effectiveness in the real world,” Blondell said.  
7/7/17
Work has begun on a pedestrian and bike path connector that will run underneath the new building for the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. The path will run from Allen and Main streets leading into the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus gateway.
7/7/17
An article about Hepatitis C and the new group of drugs that offer a 90 percent cure rate interviews Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine, who leads liver disease research at UB’s Clinical and Translational Research Center. “We’re not only seeing the fact that the older generation is dying of cirrhosis and increased liver cancer in larger numbers, but just when we thought we were going to get rid of this disease because we have these new therapies, now we’ve got all these young people coming in with Hepatitis C,” he said.