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Media Coverage

8/30/17
The Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences welcomed its largest class of medical students at a ceremony where 180 students received their white coats. David A. Milling, MD, associate dean for student and academic affairs, discussed the reasons why the school was able to boost its enrollment, including the new medical school building downtown. “With new space that can accommodate them, increase class sizes — so a perfect opportunity for us to do this. Workforce issues in our area and outside our area as well,” he said.
8/30/17
Articles about a chest injury sustained by new Buffalo Bills receiver Jordan Matthews, who is sidelined indefinitely because of a chip fracture in his sternum, interview Matthew J. DiPaola, MD, clinical assistant professor of orthopaedics, who said a chip fracture involves a small sliver or shell breaking off any bone in the body. Chip fractures don’t usually require surgery and are treated through rest and anti-inflammatory medicine, he said, adding that a chip fracture to the sternum could cause a person discomfort when breathing.
8/29/17
The UB logo is now in place near the top of the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences building overlooking the corner of Allen and Main streets. Weighing 800 pounds and measuring 83 inches by 161¼ inches by 6½ inches deep, the bright-blue lettered logo, made of aluminum, was lifted by crane 140 feet for its installation. The logo was designed to be halo-illuminated, so at nighttime it will be backlit against the building.
8/25/17
The tragic events that took place in Charlottesville have spurred numerous debates on race, religion and rights. Meanwhile, a pair of Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences neurosurgeons offered a unique perspective on race from the lens of an operating microscope. Elad I. Levy, MD, MBA, L. Nelson Hopkins III, MD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Neurosurgery, and Adnan H. Siddiqui, MD, PhD, professor and vice chair of neurosurgery, wrote that as brain surgeons, they are reminded daily that color is truly skin deep. As soon as the scalpel scores the skin, all patients look the same.
8/17/17
Ramon E. Rivera, MD, assistant professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, was interviewed about possible contamination of endoscopes used in colonoscopies performed at the Veterans Administration hospital in Buffalo. “The worst thing that could come out of this,” Rivera said, “would be for patients sitting at home saying ‘You know what? I won’t get my colonoscopy.’”
8/16/17
A report on the installation of the UB logo on the new Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences building downtown interviews UB project manager Jennifer Kuhn, who described the installation as “a pinnacle moment in the construction” of the building. “Basically everything’s new in the building. New office furniture and new conference room tables, everything’s new,” she said…. “It’s a lot of people, a lot of building to fill.”
8/15/17
A new study by Stephanie Anzman-Frasca, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics, has shown that placemats can be used to encourage children to eat healthier food in restaurants. "Making healthy options appealing and easy to choose offers the potential to increase children's acceptance of them in restaurants,” she said.
8/15/17
A new study has found that heart failure patients who took aspirin daily were not at higher risk of being hospitalized for, or dying from, heart failure. Susan Graham, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, who worked on the study, said heart patients — and older adults in general — are often taking many prescription drugs at any given time. “That speaks to the importance of studying potential drug interactions,” she said. “We have to stay on our toes to make sure that we’re doing the right thing.”
8/15/17
A new study has identified a gene that plays a central role in either protecting from stress or contributing to depression, depending on its level of activity in a part of the brain associated with motivation, pleasure and reward-seeking. David Dietz, PhD, associate professor and interim chair of pharmacology and toxicology, said little was known previously about the biological basis of depression in the brain. “We’re starting to really get an idea of what does the depressed brain look like,” he said. “When you put the whole puzzle together, you see where the problem is…. For the first time this is one of those bigger pieces you can slide into the jigsaw puzzle.”
8/15/17
Research by Fraser J. Sim, PhD, associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology, successfully tested a method for determining how relevant to the human disease findings are from mouse models. “This is an important resource for the field as it allows us to compare human and rodent cells, and provides a point of reference to understand whether or not gene expression patterns are conserved between species,” he said.
8/14/17
Umesh Sharma, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine, has received a five-year, $1 million grant to study a protein that, in excessive amounts, during a heart attack promotes the formation of fibrous tissue in the heart.
8/14/17
An article reports on a new UB study that challenges a surgical practice used for decades during arthroscopic knee surgery, and quotes Leslie J. Bisson, MD, professor and chair of orthopaedics. “Those with less surgery got better faster in comparison with the people we did more surgery on,” he said.
8/11/17
An article reports on research being conducted by Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, and two student researchers to find out if telemedicine can improve hepatitis C treatment for patients who take methadone and, if so, how it can work best. “This is a population that not only has been excluded from medical care but also from research,” Talal said.
8/11/17
An article on the opioid epidemic in Western New York interviews Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine and vice chair of addiction medicine, who said that when Prescription Monitoring Programs started to take effect, a vast population of addicts began turning to heroin. “When doctors stopped prescribing licit drugs to these patients, they turned to the illicit market where diverted prescription drugs and highly potent illegal drugs were becoming more available at lower costs,” he said.
8/9/17
Umesh Sharma, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine, has received a grant of $1 million from the National Institutes of Health to continue work on a study involving heart failure after a heart attack.