Media Coverage

11/6/17
A group of researchers have used a powerful x-ray to create 3D maps of sections of mouse brains in an effort to obtain a clearer picture of the brain at a level that scientists normally learn about by cutting through sliced samples of brain tissue. Ciprian N. Ionita, PhD, research assistant professor of biomedical engineering, was not involved in the study, but said he was impressed with how the researchers were able to clearly distinguish nerve cells from blood vessels. “This kind of resolution, this kind of imaging can give you information about structures down to the cellular level,” he said.
11/6/17
Qidni Labs, winner of the 43North competition in October 2017, reports it is working to raise $2.5 million to continue development of the startup’s nano-filters, which function like a kidney, and notes the company will open an office in Buffalo and collaborate with the Division of Nephrology within the Department of Medicine in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.
11/3/17
An article in Third Age reports on a study that provides a groundbreaking look at how advance care planning medical orders inform emergency medical service providers’ experiences involving people with intellectual disabilities. Brian Clemency, DO, clinical associate professor of emergency medicine, is one of the authors.
11/3/17
An article about New York State’s 10 Centers of Excellence for Alzheimer’s Disease, including the Western New York center based at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, interviews Bruce R. Troen, MD, center co-director and professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, and Kinga Szigeti, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and center co-director.
11/3/17
Eric Ten Brock, MD, professor of medicine, speaks about the changes to a person’s health that daylight savings time can bring about. “There have been studies that demonstrate increased risk of strokes and acute myocardial infarction that day and the next day,” says Ten Brock, who specializes in sleep medicine. "Over 40 percent of adults in this country are chronically sleep-deprived. And to lose one more hour is sort of a stress test and can exacerbate that problem so that people are often more tired.” The biannual time changes have also been liked to an increased risk of depression and mood changes.
11/1/17
An article on construction of the new Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences building notes that the grand opening is scheduled for December, with students slated to begin using the building in January. The new medical school building houses modular 21st century learning environments that include updated classrooms and laboratories. The design features two L-shaped structures linked by a six-story, light-filled glass atrium.
11/1/17
Adnan Siddiqui, MD, PhD, professor of neurosurgery, and Michael R. Ferrick, MD, clinical associate professor of orthopaedics, were among UB faculty interviewed about young athletes and weight training. “As long as it is done with appropriate technique, supervision, appropriate rest days and appropriate weight amounts and reps,” weight training can be “good for general overall health,” Ferrick said.
10/31/17
Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, is interviewed in MD Magazine about the TOPIC multiple sclerosis study and Aubagio’s effect of cortical gray matter atrophy (CGMA) loss. The article includes a video interview with Zivadinov, director of the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center.
10/27/17
An article about an institute that is building a library of 3D pictures of human nerve cells interviews Michal K. Stachowiak, PhD, professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, who said the database could eventually answer a central question by connecting genomic data with the pictures: what difference in a person’s genetic material can give rise to things like tumors and epilepsy? “It’s never been done,” he said. “And if you do it, you gain such vast information.”
10/25/17
Articles about the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act — or MACRA — interview Nancy H. Nielsen, MD, PhD, senior associate dean for health policy. “The first thing physicians have to understand — and most do not — is that this whole business of shifting to pay for value is not part of the ACA. It’s a completely different bill and was passed by 92 senators, so it’s a very bipartisan effort to try to shift payment away from fee-for-service,” she said.
10/23/17
An article about where Buffalo fits into the future of medicine reports L. Nelson Hopkins, MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and former chair of of neurosurgery, and Adnan Siddiqui, MD, PhD, professor of neurosurgery, have co-authored “The Future of Medicine,” a new book that functions as a global overview of how the forces of change will affect the health care industry moving forward. “The health of our population shows the wear and tear of long winters, lives spent working on our feet and a steady diet of hearty, but not heart-healthy comfort food,” they wrote. “We’re aging, and presenting the typical signs that go hand in hand with aging — higher rates of stroke, cancer, Alzheimer’s and heart disease.”
10/23/17
The global Physicians for Human Rights organization trains health care providers in physical, gynecological and psychological forensic evaluation for asylum seekers. Kim Griswold, MD, associate professor of family medicine, says Buffalo is a popular location for asylum seekers for several reasons. “One is that we have the largest shelter in the United States for asylum seekers, Vive La Casa. Also we have a lot of local resources, like the Center for Survivors, that are able to identify folks seeking asylum.”
10/17/17
A new book co-edited by Mulchand S. Patel, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of biochemistry, and colleagues explores in detail the many fetal and immediate postnatal nutritional influences on adult health. "Our animal studies have shown that overfeeding, or the increased intake of carbohydrate-derived calories during the immediate postnatal period, can reprogram an individual's metabolism, creating negative health outcomes later in life," he said.
10/17/17
Albert H. Titus, PhD, professor and chair of biomedical engineering; Shambhu Upadhyaya, professor of computer science and engineering; and Wenyao Xu, assistant professor of computer science and engineering; are board members of Peeva, a company that aims to develop a scanner that can read any pet chip on the market.
10/16/17
Michael E. Cain, MD, vice president for health sciences and dean of the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, talks about the construction of the school’s new building downtown and the 25 percent increase in enrollment in the school this year to help address the regional and national physician shortage. “Part of this vision of continuing to increase excellence in health care delivery in Western New York was doing these three things: we are moving the medical school, we are building a new one specially designed to be 21st century and we are building programs that attract students here and keep students here and allow us to recruit the best physician-scientists.”