Media Coverage

8/28/18
An opinion piece in the Buffalo News about the “very rare” use of buprenorphine in the emergency room of a California hospital to treat opioid-addicted patients noted that it is not rare in Western New York, where the practice was initiated by Joshua J. Lynch, DO, clinical assistant professor of emergency medicine in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. “Lynch knows that opioid addiction is a chronic disease requiring immediate aggressive treatment and management and therefore initiated a protocol of administering Suboxone at the time of ER treatment. But he didn’t stop there. He enlisted the help of his department chairman and emergency medicine colleagues. Recognizing that access to follow-up care was a problem, he approached local clinics and asked that they hold open appointment times for patients in crisis,” the article notes.
8/27/18
An article co-authored by David Dietz, PhD, associate professor and chair, Craig T. Werner, PhD, a postdoctoral associate, and Jennifer A. Martin, a doctoral student, all in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, tells about high-profile celebrities who have relapsed into addiction and looks at the painful reality of treating the illness. “Addiction — and relapse — are not the result of a lack of effort, but rather the known symptoms of both a medical and psychosocial problem. In this context, relapse is not indicative of a personal failure but rather a systemic one. Our current treatment regimens still too often fail to prevent relapses because they are still struggling to treat the underlying disease,” they write.
8/27/18
A story on WKBW-TV back-to-school tips to help children get a good night’s sleep includes suggestions from M. Jeffery Mador, MD, associate professor of medicine in the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, to make sure they’re well rested and ready for school.
8/24/18
Research led by Ruogang Zhao, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, has developed new biotechnology that places lung tissue on electronic chips, allowing researchers to more affordably simulate the progression of pulmonary fibrosis over time and potentially develop new medications.
8/24/18
Research by Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, analyzed the fossilized feces of the canine ancestors of dogs and wolves to discover that the extinct species had a jawbone powerful enough to crush the bones of its prey.
8/23/18
Local and national media are reporting on a study published in the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation by UB concussion researchers John J. Leddy, MD, clinical professor of orthopaedics, and Barry S. Willer, PhD, professor of psychiatry. Their study found that 21 retired NFL and NHL players exhibited no signs of early onset dementia, which would have been expected if they were affected by the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which has been linked to athletes with a history of concussive or sub-concussive injuries.
8/23/18
Tianeptine is an unapproved antidepressant drug that is believed to have caused an increase in calls to U.S. poison centers. Raphael J. Leo, MD, associate professor of psychiatry, recently published a case study on the drug that noted that blogs advocate use of amounts greater than the recommended daily antidepressant dose in order to achieve “opioid-like effects.” Some people who seek out tianeptine are searching for “a supplement to enhance mood and cognitive function,” he said, adding that he does not think all purchasers “necessarily think of it as an opiate.”
8/21/18
New UB research has shown that, for patients with multiple sclerosis, the disappearance of lesions into the cerebrospinal fluid is a better indicator of who will develop disability than the appearance or expansion of the lesions, and quotes Robert Zivadinov, professor of neurology. “Using the appearance of new brain lesions and the enlargement of existing ones as the indicator of disease progression, there was no sign of who would develop disability during five or 10 years of follow-up, but when we used the amount of brain lesion volume that had atrophied, we could predict within the first six months who would develop disability progression over long-term follow-up,” said Zivadinov, who serves as director of the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center (BNAC) in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and directs the Center for Biomedical Imaging at UB’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI).
8/17/18
An article about a local couple who in the past two years has seen three of their four children return to Buffalo to live features John B. Ortolani, MD, assistant professor of surgery, who attended the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, then moved to Roanoke, Virginia, and Shreveport, Louisiana, before returning to Buffalo in 2017.
8/16/18
Empire Genomics, the biotechnology company co-founded in 2006 by Norma J. Nowak, PhD, professor of biochemistry and executive director of UB’s New York State Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics and Life Sciences, will move from downtown Buffalo to new offices in Amherst.
8/15/18
Research by Fraser J. Sim, PhD, associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology has found that a receptor called muscarinic type 3 (M3R), a key regulator of the remyelination process, is a promising drug target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. “This work establishes that M3R has a functional role and if blocked, could improve myelin repair,” he said. “It better positions the field for clinical trials that will be aimed at blocking these receptors in MS patients.”
8/15/18
Research by Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, has found that a new, highly accurate MRI technique can monitor iron levels in the brains of multiple sclerosis patients, helping to identify those at a higher risk for developing physical disability.
8/7/18
An article about the singer Demi Lovato, who was hospitalized recently for an apparent drug overdose, and the enduring struggle of addiction and relapse, interviews Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine and vice chair of addiction medicine, who said a number of risk factors make relapses perilous, but the major culprit is often losing tolerance. “When a relapse occurs, someone may take a dose that they think is going to be effective — and it may even be half of what they were taking before — but because they’ve lost their tolerance, those tend to be lethal,” he said.
8/2/18
An article about a major study presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Chicago shows an Associated Press file photo of a human brain with Alzheimer’s disease on display at the Museum of Neuroanatomy in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.
8/1/18
An article on Spectroscopy Now reports on research by Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, that found that a new, highly accurate MRI technique can monitor iron levels in the brains of multiple sclerosis patients, helping to identify those at a higher risk for developing physical disability. “Iron depletion or increase in several structures of the brain is an independent predictor of disability related to MS,” said Zivadinov, who is also director of the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center (BNAC) and directs the Center for Biomedical Imaging at UB’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI).