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Gerald Sufrin, MD

Gerald Sufrin, MD, has won an award that recognizes his long career full of achievements in the field of urology. 

Sufrin Honored for Contributions to Urologic Research and Education

Published May 17, 2017

Gerald Sufrin, MD, professor and chair of the Department of Urology, has been selected as the recipient of the 2017 Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Urological Association (AUA).

“People often stereotype Buffalo and express the opinion that you can’t advance from here, but that’s just not true ... I have never felt that being in Buffalo is a barrier to advancement. On the contrary, the opportunities in this city allow for success.”
Professor and chair of urology

Sufrin received the award for his contributions to urologic education, research, clinical practice and service in the field of urology.

Research Expertise in Urologic Oncology

Sufrin, a physician with UBMD Urology, has been devoted to clinical and translational research in urologic oncology throughout his career. Specifically, he has studied prostate and renal malignancy. He has investigated neoadjuvant therapy and novel therapies for prostatic malignancy, and he has engaged in basic prostatic research.

Additionally, Sufrin has expert knowledge about the effect of early cancer diagnosis and therapy on long-term survival.

His research has been published in journals including Oncology, Seminars in Urology, Urology, the Journal of Urology and Surgical Clinics of North America.

Extensive NIH Service

Sufrin has chaired and been a member of several National Institutes of Health (NIH) advisory boards, committees and study sections. 

Notably, Sufrin was a member of the NIH’s Surgery, Anesthesiology and Trauma Study Section. For four years, he — along with 11 other members from prestigious institutions around the country — reviewed grant applications examining research proposals in surgery, anesthesiology, trauma and surgical critical care. 

From 1994 to 1998, Sufrin was also a member of the NIH’s Grants Review Committee Study Section of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. He reviewed proposals for institutional training grants, multi-center clinical trials, mentored career awards and fellowships. 

Other study sections that he has been involved in covered areas including small business innovative research, the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia and specialized programs of research excellence in prostate cancer. 

Lifelong Dedication to Mentoring

Sufrin says he is always eager to share with trainees the patient-care and research experience he has gleaned over the past five decades.

“We have, for example, very accomplished physicians in our residency program, and our faculty advises them on research and career development,” says Sufrin.

“Our residents, moreover, have a high rate of acceptance to fellowships, should they elect additional training, because our department is committed to the success of its residents.”

“Throughout their training, we encourage our residents to ensure that they achieve their goals,” he adds.

“In addition, if a medical student decides they want to pursue residency in urology, we mentor, advise and counsel them on residency selection. Despite the competitiveness intrinsic to securing a urologic residency, the medical students we’ve mentored have been accepted to their desired residencies,” he says.

Involved in Various Professional Associations, Societies

Sufrin is a member of more than a dozen professional associations and societies — including the highly selective American Association of Genitourinary Surgeons — and he encourages trainees to submit their research for presentation at national meetings.

He also notes that the most selective of urological societies, the Clinical Society of Genitourinary Surgeons, had a Buffalo physician as one of its founding members.

“Co-founder Dr. James Augustus Gardener was a nationally acclaimed urologist who helped establish this prestigious society in 1921, and he is just one of many examples of physicians who have excelled in Buffalo,” explains Sufrin, who is currently president of the society.

“People often stereotype Buffalo and express the opinion that you can’t advance from here, but that’s just not true,” he emphasizes. “I have never felt that being in Buffalo is a barrier to advancement. On the contrary, the opportunities in this city allow for success.” 

Holding Various AUA Roles

The AUA notes that Sufrin also received the award for his commitment to the AUA, where as treasurer he supervised the construction of its new headquarters building. 

In addition to serving as treasurer for four years, Sufrin was the chair of the AUA’s Educational Council from 1985 to 1991, and from 1995 to 1999 he chaired the Research Committee of the AUA. 

He accepted the award at a May 16 ceremony during the AUA’s annual meeting.