Topics

5/17/17

Twenty residents in the Department of Psychiatry participated in a mental health awareness fair to advocate for services available in Erie County.

5/3/17

UB researchers are developing innovative ways to better diagnose and treat hepatitis C virus (HCV) in people with substance abuse disorders.

2/17/17

At the 2017 Medical Student Research Forum, aspiring physician-scientists showcased 46 original research projects they conducted at the University at Buffalo, its partner health care agencies and institutions nationwide.

1/31/17

Students from the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences joined hundreds of their UB peers in the health professions, social work, law and management for an interprofessional forum on opioid dependence.

10/28/16

A new preclinical study by researchers in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology finds exercise, coupled with methamphetamine, may help recovery of those addicted to the drug and increase their odds of avoiding relapse.

9/20/16

A team led by David M. Dietz, PhD, has discovered that a protein in the brain’s reward center, the nucleus accumbens, regulates genes that help drive the craving for cocaine after a period of withdrawal. 

6/9/16

Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, has received a $7 million grant to develop an effective way to treat drug users with the hepatitis C virus (HCV).

5/2/16

Jun-Xu Li, MD, PhD, assistant professor of pharmacology and toxicology, has received the Joseph Cochin Young Investigator Award from the College of Problems of Drug Dependence (CPDD) for his research on pharmacotherapy for stimulant abuse.

4/6/16

According to a fact sheet released by the White House, the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences is among medical schools nationwide at the forefront of fighting the opioid epidemic.

2/19/16
Aspiring physician-scientists showcased 38 original research projects at the 2016 Medical Student Research Forum. The displays showed work they conducted at the University at Buffalo, its partner health care agencies and institutions nationwide.
2/8/16

The University at Buffalo is strengthening education for medical residents who care for patients who are addicted or are at risk for addiction by focusing more training on safe prescribing practices and safe pain management.

9/3/15

The American Psychological Association’s Society of Addiction Psychology (SoAP) has honored Kenneth E. Leonard, PhD, with a Distinguished Scientific Contributions award for his addictions research.

8/27/15

Researchers in the lab of David Dietz, PhD, assistant professor of pharmacology and toxicology, discovered an unknown neural pathway that can regulate changes made in the brain from cocaine use. 

2/6/15
At the 2015 Medical Student Research Forum, aspiring physician-scientists showcased 45 original research projects they conducted at the University at Buffalo, its partner health care agencies and institutions nationwide.
9/19/14

Research by David Dietz, PhD, has the potential to identify novel therapies to treat addiction to cocaine and other psychostimulants, for which no effective drug therapy exists.

8/21/14

Nearly 100 student-scientists from across the country showcased their original biomedical research during the 2014 Buffalo Summer Research Day.

7/11/14

Research co-authored by Andrew H. Talal, MD, shows that injection drug users who are enrolled in a treatment program want to be educated about hepatitis C virus (HCV) and are willing to be treated.

6/3/14

Zhen Yan, PhD, professor of physiology and biophysics, has received $1.6 million to continue her study of human dopamine D4 receptor variants — a type of neurotransmitter receptor in the brain’s prefrontal cortex.

5/1/14
A novel compound severely blunts a host of cocaine addiction behaviors, including relapse behavior, according to a University at Buffalo animal study that holds promise for a groundbreaking treatment.
3/7/14

The risks of the new painkiller Zohydro — an extended-release formulation of hydrocodone — far outweigh the benefits and could lead to more overdoses, according to Richard D. Blondell, MD, vice chair for addiction medicine and professor of family medicine.