Topics

5/12/15
Researchers in the University at Buffalo’s Department of Neurology shared their findings through more than 30 presentations at the American Academy of Neurology’s 67th Annual Meeting.
4/29/15

Students in the School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences were among those recognized for outstanding achievement during the University at Buffalo’s 11th Celebration of Student Academic Excellence.

3/6/15
University at Buffalo researchers are the first to identify solifenacin as a drug target to promote stem cell therapy for myelin-based disease, such as multiple sclerosis.
2/12/15

As part of the state-funded $105 million collaboration between the University at Buffalo and the New York Genome Center (NYGC), the year-old Buffalo Institute for Genomics and Data Analytics (BIG) is helping to develop upstate New York as a national center for genomic medicine research.

1/28/15
A University at Buffalo pilot study using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) links dietary habits with iron levels in the brain — a factor associated with various neurological conditions as well as aging.
7/15/14

University at Buffalo scientists have identified SOX10 as the single transcription factor or “master switch” that initiates myelination in the brain.

2/27/14

Although their oft-cited prior study found no causal relationship between venous abnormalities in the neck and multiple sclerosis (MS), University at Buffalo neurological researchers are strongly advocating more investigation.

10/25/13

In the quest to find a pharmaceutical target to repair myelin — the nerve sheath destroyed in multiple sclerosis — University at Buffalo researchers aim to test a drug that blocks the activity of the M3 receptor gene.

7/23/13
M. Laura Feltri, MD, professor of biochemistry, has been honored with the 2013 Distinguished Postdoc Mentor Award.
7/9/13

UB researchers and their global collaborators are building a growing body of evidence that links changes in the brain’s thalamus region to MS.

6/10/13

UB researchers and their global collaborators are building a growing body of evidence that links changes in the brain’s thalamus region to MS.