Topics

7/30/18

Newly published research led by Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, finds novel indicators for predicting worsening conditions in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients.

3/28/18

Research led by Fraser J. Sim, PhD, associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology, that seeks to spur development of cellular and molecular therapies for adult demyelinating disease, such as multiple sclerosis, has gained funding from the National Institutes of Health.

3/21/18

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS) has given its Impact Award to Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, MD, professor of neurology, a widely known leading expert on multiple sclerosis (MS) in adults and children.

2/15/18

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS) has funded two separate projects led by researchers in the departments of Neurology and Pharmacology and Toxicology.

9/21/17

Researchers in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology have developed and successfully tested a method for determining whether promising new multiple sclerosis (MS) treatments in mice could be effective in humans.

6/14/17

A preliminary study by senior author Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, MD, has heightened researchers’ understanding about which adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be at a higher risk for developing worsening MS.

1/27/17

The Jacobs Multiple Sclerosis Center for Treatment and Research — a clinical partner of the Department of Neurology — is nearing the end of a yearlong collaboration with a research group that’s creating an application to improve patient care and the efficiency of clinical care systems.

12/14/16
Researchers have identified a critical step in myelination after birth that has significance for treating neurodegenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS).
8/29/16

Department of Neurology researchers are testing a new software tool they developed that could make assessing brain atrophy part of the clinical routine for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients.

8/3/16

Cerebral microbleeds are associated with increased physical and cognitive disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to new research from the Department of Neurology.

7/6/16

UB researchers led by M. Laura Feltri, MD, professor of biochemistry and neurology, have discovered that mechanical forces play a critical role in the formation of myelin.

5/6/16

Researchers in the University at Buffalo’s Department of Neurology shared their findings through 30 presentations at the American Academy of Neurology’s 68th Annual Meeting.

2/8/16

Ralph H. Benedict, PhD, professor in the Department of Neurology, has been named the 2016 recipient of the International Neuropsychological Society (INS) Mid-Career Award.

10/6/15

Researchers at the Hunter James Kelly Research Institute (HJKRI) have discovered a new way to study the interface where cells in the myelination process touch — a method that may lead to a better understanding of myelin diseases.

9/11/15

A research team led by Richard M. Gronostajski, PhD, professor of biochemistry, has discovered a new way to generate oligodendrocytes. This method has the potential to enhance treatments for brain injury, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and more.

5/12/15
Researchers in the University at Buffalo’s Department of Neurology shared their findings through more than 30 presentations at the American Academy of Neurology’s 67th Annual Meeting.
4/29/15

Students in the School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences were among those recognized for outstanding achievement during the University at Buffalo’s 11th Celebration of Student Academic Excellence.

3/6/15
University at Buffalo researchers are the first to identify solifenacin as a drug target to promote stem cell therapy for myelin-based disease, such as multiple sclerosis.
2/12/15

As part of the state-funded $105 million collaboration between the University at Buffalo and the New York Genome Center (NYGC), the year-old Buffalo Institute for Genomics and Data Analytics (BIG) is helping to develop upstate New York as a national center for genomic medicine research.

1/28/15
A University at Buffalo pilot study using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) links dietary habits with iron levels in the brain — a factor associated with various neurological conditions as well as aging.