Media Coverage

12/12/19
Several news outlets reported on UB partner company Garwood Medical Devices, which has been granted a “Breakthrough Devices” designation that will expedite review of the company’s BioPrax device by the FDA. BioPrax, developed to treat biofilm infections on prosthetic knee implants, was created using technology licensed from UB. The electrical stimulation method that BioPrax uses was developed through a multidisciplinary collaboration between the labs of Mark Ehrensberger, PhD, associate professor of biomedical engineering, and Anthony A. Campagnari, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of microbiology and immunology.
12/12/19
A new preclinical study by UB researchers investigated how drug abstinence changes gene expression. The research reveals the genetic basis of relapse, one of the most detrimental but poorly understood behaviors related to addiction. “The novelty of our current paper is that it begins to reveal what happens on a cellular basis, what genes are turned on and off during a prolonged period of abstinence,” says David Dietz, PhD, a senior author of the study and associate professor and chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology.
12/12/19
Multiple news outlets reported that UB has launched a behavior change and weight loss program for adults with prediabetes. Developed by internationally known obesity expert Leonard H. Epstein, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of pediatrics and chief of the Division of Behavioral Medicine, the program has, in previous studies, resulted in participants losing an average of 20 pounds over six months.
12/12/19
Reports on the launch event for the new biorepository in UB’s Clinical and Translational Research Center quote Norma J. Nowak, PhD, professor of biochemistry and executive director of UB's New York State Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics and Life Sciences, and Venu Govindaraju, vice president for research and economic development.
11/18/19
News outlets reported on a retrospective five-year study of 1,314 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) by researchers in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. The team found that atrophied brain lesion volume is the only marker from MRI scans that can accurately predict which patients will progress to the most severe form of the disease. “This study corroborates initial reports from our group regarding using atrophied lesion volume as a potential MRI marker of disease progression in a large, population-based cohort of MS patients followed in clinical routine,” said Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, professor of neurology in the Jacobs School and director of the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center and the Center for Biomedical Imaging at UB’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute.
11/1/19
Research on molecular mechanisms behind heroin addiction relapse is led by David Dietz, PhD, associate professor and chair of pharmacology and toxicology, who said this study is one of few that examine the changes in the brain that cause people to relapse. “In the not too distant future, with all the findings, we can hopefully start to find real treatment to relieve the horrific conditions that people suffer from addiction with and break the cycle of drug-taking, relapse, drug-taking, relapse,” he said.
11/1/19
Preclinical research conducted by Tracey A. Ignatowski, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, is demonstrating that perispinal injection of an antibody that blocks tumor necrosis factor-alpha alleviates chronic neuropathic pain. 
11/1/19
Susan S. Baker, MD, PhD, professor of pediatrics, is quoted in an articles on research that found strains of the bacterium Klebsiella pneumonia, which produces high levels of alcohol, in 60 percent of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a common disorder in which fat builds up in the liver. Baker, who was not involved in the study, said, “Other bacteria have been shown to make alcohol, so that… verifies what other researchers have seen. We’ve never really been able to induce the inflammation that you see [in people], but they were able to do that.”
11/1/19
Praveen K. Chandrasekharan, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics, is interviewed for an article about the controversies and successful results of kratom. Chandrasekharan said that he frankly does not know if the drug is safe or not. “I can only tell you that kratom needs more research to know its safety profile,” he said.
10/31/19
UB researchers are studying the effectiveness of the Opioid Intervention Court. The program has clearly had an impact, but policymakers and providers want evidence to show that the unique legal, social and psychological assistance the court provides contributes to positive results. “We will deepen our understanding about OIC and traditional drug-court participants over a 12-month period,” according to Linda S. Kahn, PhD, a principal investigator on the study and professor of family medicine and associate vice chair for research for the Primary Care Research Institute in the Department of Family Medicine.
10/31/19
The UB Center for Successful Aging has received a $1.5 million grant. “We’re looking at an environment that really incentivizes innovation in a way that helps older adults — and when we help older adults, we almost always help the entire community,” said Bruce R. Troen, MD, center director, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine.
10/30/19
A story on about how to pick the right health care plan for you and your wallet interviews Nancy H. Nielsen, MD, PhD, senior associate dean for health policy, who said it’s difficult to predict whether something bad is going to happen. “But in general, you can pretty much gauge it based on what your family’s needs have been in the past,” she said.
10/25/19
The Gates Vascular Institute (GVI) has completed its 200th procedure using the Watchman device, a permanent implant that prevents blood clots from escaping a small pouch along the heart and causing a stroke. “This is a real big advancement in terms of the ability to reduce the risk of stroke in people who are at high risk of bleeding... We have not had a single patient need to go back on a blood thinner. Every one of them has done well,” said Vijay S. Iyer, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. He is also director of structural heart interventions at GVI.
10/24/19
Susan S. Baker, MD, PhD, professor of pediatrics, is quoted in an article about the pursuit of better baby formulas. “As the understanding and the knowledge become more and more sophisticated, and we learn about new molecules and new things that are in breast milk, the goal would be to mimic that,” Baker says. But, she adds, ingredients should be added only if there’s evidence they’re beneficial.
10/21/19
A report on the rising number of women dying in childbirth in New York State cites Vanessa M.Barnabei, MD, PhD, professor and chair of obstetrics and gynecology, as a member of the Maternal Mortality Advisory Council. State government has organized the Council to examine the problem.