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Wilma                          Hofmann

Wilma A. Hofmann PhD

Department of Physiology and Biophysics

Associate Professor

 
Professional Summary:

In my laboratory, we are interested in structural components of the cell, their role in establishing and regulating cellular functions, and how this regulation translates into physiological consequences in health and disease.
We have two major focus areas: 1) The role of cytoskeletal elements in prostate cancer development and progression and 2) The role of nucleoskeletal elements in establishing and maintaining nuclear structure and function.

1) The majority of death from cancer is caused by metastasis, the spreading of cancer cells from the site of a primary tumor to other body parts. We use a combination of biochemical, cell biological, physiological, and translational approaches to elucidate the mechanisms that are involved in the acquisition of metastatic phenotypes. Specifically, we focus on the role that myosins play in this process. We are also interested in how dietary fats can contribute to the development of metastatic phenotypes in prostate cancer cells.

2) Aberrations in nuclear structure and dynamics are the underlying cause of diseases ranging from cancer to premature aging. We are interested in the role of nuclear actin and myosins in regulating dynamic nuclear processes such as nucleolar assembly and functions in health and disease.

Education and Training:
  • PhD, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Wuerzburg (2002)
  • MS, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Wuerzburg (1999)
Employment:
  • Associate Professor, Physiology and Biophysics, University at Buffalo (2015-present)
  • Assistant Professor, Physiology and Biophysics, University at Buffalo (2008–2015)
  • Research Assistant Professor, Physiology and Biophysics, University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Medicine (2005–2008)
  • Postdoctoral Research Associate, Physiology and Biophysics, University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Medicine (2002–2005)

Grants and Sponsored Research:
  • August 2017–July 2020
    Role of myosin IC in prostate cancer metastasis
    NIH/NCI
    Role: Principal Investigator
    $478,500
  • September 2014–September 2017
    Defining the link between obesity and aggressive prostate cancer
    DoD CDMRP
    Role: Principal Investigator
    $598,000
  • September 2012–September 2015
    The Role of a Novel Myosin Isoform in Prostate Cancer
    DoD CDMRP
    Role: Principal Investigator
    $340,070

Journal Articles:
See all (8 more)


School News:
In the Media:

Clinical Specialties:
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Contact Information

517 Biomedical Research Building
3435 Main Street
Buffalo, NY 14214
Phone: (716) 829-3290
Email: whofmann@buffalo.edu


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