Taylor Awarded Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship

Robert Taylor.

Robert Taylor

Published April 25, 2012

Robert Taylor, Class of 2013, is one of only 103 medical students in the country to be awarded a Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship.

The goal of the fellowship is to encourage medical students to pursue careers in clinical research.

Mentored Research and Didactic Training

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“Through this program I hope to continue building a strong foundation for incorporating research into my career in a meaningful way. ”
Robert Taylor, Class of 2013
Doris Duke Fellow

Doris Duke fellows take a year off from traditional medical school coursework to experience clinical research firsthand in a program that combines a mentored research project and didactic training.

Taylor will train at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he will be mentored by Adam Zanation, MD.

“I’m excited to begin working with the team at UNC and Dr. Zanation,” says Taylor, an Amherst, N.Y., native. “He is an otolaryngologist doing cutting-edge research in minimally invasive head and neck tumor surgery, and he has mentored several fellows during his career.”

“Through this program, I hope to continue building a strong foundation for incorporating research into my career in a meaningful way,” Taylor adds.

 

Will Participate in Physician-Scientist Community

During the year, Doris Duke fellows learn how to lead a research project from design, data collection and analysis to publication and presentation.

Taylor will be expected to lead at least one research project but may participate in any number of projects in different phases, depending on the needs of his mentor and his own interests.

He will integrate into the physician-scientist community at UNC-Chapel Hill through participation in events such as grand rounds, department conferences, lectures and seminars relevant to clinical research. At the end of the year he will present his research at a national conference attend by other Doris Duke Fellows.