Research News


Physicians in the Department of Emergency Medicine have implemented a new protocol for treating out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in Western New York that has more than doubled the patient survivor rate.


A team of researchers led by Kwang W. Oh, PhD, associate professor of biomedical engineering and electrical engineering, has fabricated a chip that uses two different types of force — capillary- and vacuum-driven — to manipulate how fluids travel in micro- and nanosized channels.


Cytocybernetics, a UB spinoff co-founded by two Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences faculty members, has been awarded $1.5 million by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop an enhanced version of a device it created that integrates electronics with heart muscle cells to test how new drugs affect the heart’s electrical activity.


Adnan Siddiqui, MD, PhD, vice chair and professor of neurosurgery and one of the lead investigators in the COMPASS trial, presented preliminary results at the International Stroke Conference in Los Angeles that show evidence that aspiration-based thrombectomy is a safe and effective alternative for patients with acute ischemic stroke.


A new review paper led by Stephanie Anzman-Frasca, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics, suggests varied diets and persistence in exposing infants and children to healthy foods is key to promoting healthy eating behaviors.


University at Buffalo spinoff POP Biotechnologies Inc. (POP BIO) ended 2017 on a high note with a flurry of activity, including reaching research agreements with two international pharmaceutical companies.


Aesha Y. Desai, PhD, postdoctoral associate in the Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, has earned an American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)/European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) Minorities Affairs Committee Travel Award for her research in the role of nanophotonics in stem cell regulation.


Research by lead author Michal K. Stachowiak, PhD, has revealed that schizophrenia likely begins toward the end of the first trimester of pregnancy — a finding that opens up a new understanding of the devastating disease and the potential for new treatment possibilities in utero.


Xiaozhong Wen, PhD, has led a pilot study to test an innovative method of smoking cessation during pregnancy and examine the correlation between maternal smoking and childhood obesity. 


Research led by Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, found that a wolf-sized otter that lived about 6 million years ago may have been a dominant predator in its time.


New clues to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which affects nearly all obese adults and a rising percentage of obese children, have been reported in a paper by senior author Susan S. Baker MD, PhD.


Surgeons from the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences have entered the national discussion on surgical headwear.


Four studies focused on improving our understanding of the human genome and microbiome have been awarded funding through the third round of research pilots supported by the Community of Excellence in Genome, Environment and Microbiome (GEM).


Jun Xia, PhD, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, has been awarded a $450,000 grant that will help improve screening for women with dense breast tissue.


A new book co-edited by Mulchand S. Patel, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of biochemistry, discusses how the path to obesity may start before birth or during infancy and how an individual’s metabolism can be permanently reprogrammed by overfeeding early in life.