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Christine Basil Brown

Pediatrics Resident Christine Brown and a young patient

I was born and raised in Buffalo, and I consider myself one of its biggest fans. Although I went away for college and medical school, I knew I wanted to come home to plant my career roots.

However, I did not want to come to UB just because it was home, so I did a sub-internship here during my fourth year in medical school with the general inpatient service. I met so many people—from the chief residents to the interns to my attending— who were all overwhelmingly enthusiastic about pediatrics. They were living, practicing, undeniably positive advertisements for the UB pediatrics program.

I interviewed at pediatric residency programs across the Northeast, but it’s hard to compare their flashy statistics and accolades with the people at Women and Children’s Hospital. The program far exceeded my expectations. I’m glad to be home, but I’m far more grateful that the UB Pediatrics program attracts so many wonderful people. I realize that my fellow interns—who have quickly become close friends—along with the senior residents and attendings are what make my experience as a UB pediatrics resident fulfilling in every way.

As an intern, the learning curve has been steep, but my journey has been enjoyable, thanks my amazing fellow residents. In the NICU, my patients were critical, the pace was demanding and the experience was, at times, incredibly intense. Yet somehow, in the midst of learning how to write total parenteral nutrition orders and then running off to high-risk deliveries, we laughed, smiled, told stories about our lives and talked about our loved ones. One morning my attending and I were sharing recipes and gardening tips and, moments later, discussing the critical findings on a chest X-ray of one of our sickest patients. Days earlier, we had shared in an end-of-life discussion with a family. Even the burden of these serious issues was made lighter by her ability to teach and guide me—and take the time to remind me of my life outside the hospital.