Media Coverage

9/25/18
Research by Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, has found that brain iron at quantitative magnetic resonance imaging is associated with disability in multiple sclerosis. "In this large cohort of MS patients and healthy controls, we have reported, for the first time, iron increasing in the basal ganglia but decreasing in thalamic structures," he said. "Iron depletion or increase in several structures of the brain is an independent predictor of disability related to MS." 
8/21/18
New UB research has shown that, for patients with multiple sclerosis, the disappearance of lesions into the cerebrospinal fluid is a better indicator of who will develop disability than the appearance or expansion of the lesions, and quotes Robert Zivadinov, professor of neurology. “Using the appearance of new brain lesions and the enlargement of existing ones as the indicator of disease progression, there was no sign of who would develop disability during five or 10 years of follow-up, but when we used the amount of brain lesion volume that had atrophied, we could predict within the first six months who would develop disability progression over long-term follow-up,” said Zivadinov, who serves as director of the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center (BNAC) in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and directs the Center for Biomedical Imaging at UB’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI).
8/15/18
Research by Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, has found that a new, highly accurate MRI technique can monitor iron levels in the brains of multiple sclerosis patients, helping to identify those at a higher risk for developing physical disability.
8/1/18
An article on Spectroscopy Now reports on research by Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, that found that a new, highly accurate MRI technique can monitor iron levels in the brains of multiple sclerosis patients, helping to identify those at a higher risk for developing physical disability. “Iron depletion or increase in several structures of the brain is an independent predictor of disability related to MS,” said Zivadinov, who is also director of the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center (BNAC) and directs the Center for Biomedical Imaging at UB’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI).
3/21/18
A feature story on Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, MD, professor of neurology, showcases her work with multiple sclerosis patients. The article interviews colleagues who include Ralph H. Benedict, PhD, professor of neurology.
2/28/18
Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, MD, professor of neurology, has received the Impact Award from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society for her research and patient care in the field.
2/21/18
Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences researchers are working on ways to improve multiple sclerosis patients’ cognitive function and to repair damage to the myelin coating that protects nerve cells. The studies are being led by Janet L. Shucard, PhD, associate professor of clinical neurology, and Fraser J. Sim, PhD, associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology.
12/8/17
Michael G. Dwyer, III, PhD, assistant professor of neurology and biomedical informatics, was interviewed about a group of Americans and Canadians in Cuba who in September suffered symptoms that included hearing loss, dizziness, headache, fatigue, cognitive issues and difficulty sleeping, which prompted concerns their symptoms were caused by a neural toxin. Dwyer said the brain is made up of gray matter and white matter. “The gray matter is kind of like the actual computational units, the neuronal cell bodies,” he said. “The white matter is the wiring closet of the brain, composed almost entirely of axons that helps connect different parts of the brain.”
11/14/17
Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, MD, professor of neurology, is the principal investigator of clinical trials exploring potential therapeutic applications of cannabinoids in progressive multiple sclerosis. Weinstock-Guttman is executive director of the New York State Multiple Sclerosis Consortium.
11/3/17
An article about New York State’s 10 Centers of Excellence for Alzheimer’s Disease, including the Western New York center based at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, interviews Bruce R. Troen, MD, center co-director and professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, and Kinga Szigeti, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and center co-director.
10/31/17
Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, is interviewed in MD Magazine about the TOPIC multiple sclerosis study and Aubagio’s effect of cortical gray matter atrophy (CGMA) loss. The article includes a video interview with Zivadinov, director of the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center.
9/15/17
David W. Hojnacki, MD, assistant professor of neurology, received the Stephen H. Kelly Award as a “Professional on the Move” at the “Champions on the Move” event sponsored by the Upstate Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.
7/25/17
Gil I. Wolfe, MD, professor and Irvin and Rosemary Smith Chair of neurology, talks about myasthenia gravis, a chronic autoimmune neuromuscular disease that often gives people difficulty operating muscles they should be able to control. He said said many people diagnosed with the disease have never heard of it. “In general, people with MG do very well,” he said. “They can hold jobs, they can exercise, they can be active in their family lives.”
7/13/17
An article about a local 17-year-old with congenital muscular dystrophy and his everyday routine of countering the obstacles posed by the disease interviews Nicholas J. Silvestri, MD, clinical associate professor of neurology and a specialist in neuromuscular disorders. “The absence of a particular protein (merosin) forming the muscle membrane leads to progressive destruction of muscle cells over time which are not able to fully repair themselves,” he said.
6/16/17
An article about managing symptoms of multiple sclerosis while pregnant interviews Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, MD, professor of neurology, who said when trying to conceive, it’s generally recommended that women stop taking medications that stave off MS relapses. “But going off medication increases the risk for relapse. So you have to determine which therapy is safest for the mother and baby,” she said.