Media Coverage

1/22/20
A UB study suggests a link between fats in the blood and problems with arteries in people with multiple sclerosis. “This study provides another research avenue that may supplement previous findings published by our comprehensive MS group, including hyperlipidemia effects on disability progression, greater brain lesion formation and greater brain atrophy,” said Dejan Jakimovski, MD, a student in the doctoral program in neuroscience, who was the lead author of the study. Richard W. Browne, PhD, professor of biotechnical and clinical laboratory sciences; Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, MD, professor of neurology; and Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, were study co-authors.
11/18/19
News outlets reported on a retrospective five-year study of 1,314 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) by researchers in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. The team found that atrophied brain lesion volume is the only marker from MRI scans that can accurately predict which patients will progress to the most severe form of the disease. “This study corroborates initial reports from our group regarding using atrophied lesion volume as a potential MRI marker of disease progression in a large, population-based cohort of MS patients followed in clinical routine,” said Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, professor of neurology in the Jacobs School and director of the Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center and the Center for Biomedical Imaging at UB’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute.
11/8/19
Multiple Sclerosis News Today reports on a retrospective, five-year study of 1,314 patients with multiple sclerosis by researchers in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. “The fact that atrophied lesion volume was the only measure that was predictive of conversion to progressive multiple sclerosis, and brain atrophy was not, is a major novel finding of this study,” said Robert Zivadinov, MD, professor of neurology in the Jacobs School, director of its Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center and director of the Center for Biomedical Imaging at UB’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute.
10/3/19
Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, MD, professor of neurology, was quoted in a story that highlighted recent research related to vitamin D intake. Several studies have shown that people with multiple sclerosis are more likely to have low levels of vitamin D compared with healthy controls and that deficiency is both a risk factor for MS and for relapse, according to Weinstock-Guttman. “People with MS also have a higher risk of osteoporosis, primarily related to their physical disability, although there may be other contributing factors,” she said.
9/27/19
A story reports on a five-year study of 1,314 patients with multiple sclerosis led by researchers from the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. The researchers found that atrophied brain lesion volume is the only marker from MRI scans that can accurately predict which patients will progress to the most severe form of the disease. “We’re trying to prevent these lesions from forming in the first place, and now we’re also looking for medications that hopefully will prevent loss of lesions” when secondary progressive MS is strongly suspected, said Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, MD, a professor of neurology and part of the research study team.
9/23/19
Research led by Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, found that while a commonly used imaging linear contrast agent, gadodiamide, does accumulate in the brain early in the disease, there is no discernible clinical impact. “This study is one of the first to investigate the longitudinal association between well-established clinical and MRI outcomes of disease severity and gadolinium deposition,” he said. “The findings from this study should be incorporated into a risk-versus-benefit analysis when determining the need for GBCA administration in individual MS patients.”
9/9/19
Research by Kinga Szigeti, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and director of UB’s Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Disorders Center, shows that a gene that three in four people have is the key reason that Alzheimer’s drugs that show promise in animal studies failed in human trials, and that people with Alzheimer’s who receive more individualized treatments may have more success. “Since this human fusion gene was not present in the animal models and screening systems used to identify drugs, 75 percent of Alzheimer's patients who do carry this gene are less likely to benefit and therefore are at a disadvantage,” she said.
6/20/19
People with neuroimmunologic disorders — such as multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis (MG) — have concerns about the safety of vaccines for measles and other conditions but are also concerned about their additional risks of infection. “A person without a chronic neurologic illness has to contend with the symptoms of measles or shingles alone, but with one of these disorders, the disease itself can be worsened by that infection,” explains Nicholas J. Silvestri, MD, clinical associate professor of neurology.
5/6/19
A $2 million National Institutes of Health grant to UB’s Hunter James Kelly Research Institute will fund a novel approach into understanding and ultimately curing Krabbe’s Disease, the disease that killed Hunter James Kelly, the son of Jim and Jill Kelly for whom the institute was named. “Krabbe is a devastating neurological disease of newborn babies, bringing them, unfortunately, to die within a few years of life," said M. Laura Feltri, MD, professor of biochemistry and neurology, and co-director of the institute.
4/11/19
Publications reported on an international study published in The Lancet Neurology and led by Gil I. Wolfe, MD, UB Distinguished Professor and Irvin and Rosemary Smith Chair of the Department of Neurology, that found that patients with the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis do better when they undergo surgery to remove the thymus gland even five years after the procedure than do patients who do not undergo the surgery.
2/19/19
An article about efforts by the police department in Stockton, California, one of the nation’s most dangerous cities, to help officers learn how to talk about their feelings and better cope with the stress of the job reports a UB study found that between 9 and 19 percent of officers nationally are at risk for PTSD. The article notes Janet L. Shucard, PhD, associate professor of clinical neurology, and her team “hypothesize that PTSD impairs the attention and response control processes that are necessary for rapid and accurate decision-making.”
2/19/19
Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, MD, professor of neurology, is quoted in an article about a company that is seeking a fast-track designation from the FDA for a cannabis-based pharmaceutical candidate for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. “Cannabis appears to be beneficial for spasticity and additional symptoms in MS patients,” she said.
12/20/18
A new study that suggests a link between food allergies and increased disease activity in patients with multiple sclerosis interviews Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, MD, professor of neurology, who was not involved in the research. "Interestingly, a previous study on pediatric MS patients identified that food allergies that developed within the first 5 years of life were associated with a lower risk for relapses," she said. "Immunological differences developed too early versus later-life food allergens between the pediatric to adult population may be an explanation for the discordant results."
10/4/18
Gil I. Wolfe, MD, professor and Irvin and Rosemary Smith Chair of neurology, was one of several experts quoted in an article about myasthenia gravis patients who benefit most from thymectomy. “We analyzed data through month 60 to look at how persistent, how durable, the favorable response to thymectomy is,” he said. “It is quite well established that most myasthenia gravis patients after a prolonged period of focused management do quite well. We wanted to see over how long a period of time you might see benefits from thymectomy that exceeded medical therapy alone.”
10/1/18
An article reports on research by Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, that found that brain iron at quantitative magnetic resonance imaging is associated with disability in multiple sclerosis. “In this large cohort of MS patients and healthy controls, we have reported, for the first time, iron increasing in the basal ganglia but decreasing in thalamic structures,” he said. “Iron depletion or increase in several structures of the brain is an independent predictor of disability related to MS.”