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Media Coverage

3/31/17
Research by Michal K. Stachowiak, PhD, professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, shows that a common genomic pathway lies at the root of schizophrenia and could be a step toward the design of treatments that could be administered to pregnant mothers at high risk of bearing a child with schizophrenia, potentially preventing the disease before it begins.
3/21/17
Smithsonian reports on how saber-toothed cats used their large fangs and quotes Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, who said: “The back and base of sabercat skulls tend to show very expanded and bulky bony areas for the attachment of large neck muscles.”
1/6/17
UB has released a list of 12 faculty-led research projects that caught the world’s attention in 2016, appearing in news articles around the world.
1/3/17
Research co-authored by Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, focuses on a fossilized carnivore jawbone that belonged to a beardog, an early, long-extinct relative of dogs, foxes and weasels that lived up to 40 million years ago.
12/19/16
Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, has helped establish that a fossil that sat largely unnoticed in a drawer at Chicago’s Field Museum belonged to an extinct relative of dogs, foxes and weasels. The fossil represents a new genus, the taxonomic rank above species.
12/6/16
A newly described fossil skull from one of the largest of the saber-toothed cats is helping scientists understand the diversity of killing techniques used by these extinct and fearsome predators.
11/7/16
An article about a newly described fossil skull from one of the largest of the saber-toothed cats that is helping scientists understand the diversity of killing techniques used by these extinct and fearsome predators quotes Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences.
10/30/16
A news feature on the Museum of Neuroanatomy in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences interviews Christopher S. Cohan, PhD, professor of pathology and anatomical sciences and curator of the museum, which is the only collection in the nation dedicated exclusively to the human brain.
10/25/16
Many U.S. medical schools are seeing a surge in the number of people leaving their bodies to science. The increase has helped medical students and researchers because they dissect cadavers in anatomy class or use them to practice surgical techniques and test new devices and procedures. “The uses that we can bring to these very precious gifts have really escalated,” says John E. Tomaszewski, MD, professor and chair of the Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences.
10/3/16
A hyena that once roamed North America was smaller than today’s spotted hyena, lacked the hunched posture and was better-suited to chasing down prey over long distances, says Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences.
9/9/16
Stories about the surge in the number of people who are leaving their bodies to medical schools for research and training purposes report UB received almost 600 bodies last year, a doubling over the past decade, and interview Raymond P. Dannenhoffer, PhD, associate dean for support services, and John E. Tomaszewski, MD, professor and chair of pathology and anatomical sciences.
8/3/15
Michal K. Stachowiak, PhD, professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, led a team that found a single "master" growth factor of the genome. The discovery could help scientists with treatments for various types of cancer and schizophrenia. 
6/19/15
The James H. Cummings Foundation has announced a second $1 million gift to the new UB School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. The gift will go toward developing a Structural Science Learning Center, which will be led by John E. Tomaszewski, MD, chair of the Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences.
4/29/15
Visitors to UB’s Museum of Neuroanatomy can learn about how the human brain functions and how beautiful it is, says curator Christopher S. Cohan, PhD, professor of pathology and anatomical sciences.