Media Coverage

12/20/17
A new study led by Michal K. Stachowiak, PhD, professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, uses cerebral organoids, or mini-brains, to understand the cause of schizophrenia. After growing the mini-brains, the research group saw architectural difference in the cortex: immature cells that would one day turn into neurons were spreading out in too many directions with too much distance between them. “I think for the first time we have a proper experimental tool to try to see if we can either correct or prevent some of these events,” he said. 
12/6/17
Research by Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, suggests that a now-extinct Chinese otter that roamed lakes or swamps 6 million years ago was almost as large as a wolf and had jawbones capable of crushing large shells, as well as birds and mammals, making it a key predator in its ecosystem. “We don’t know for sure, but we think that this otter was more of a top predator than living species of otters are,” Tseng says. “Our findings imply that Siamogale could crush much harder and larger prey than any living otter can.”
12/1/17
Michal K. Stachowiak, PhD, professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, is asked about mini-brains and the scientific debate over the ethics of implanting human organoid tissue into the brains of mice. He said if organoids grow closer to the size of full human brains, even the size of an infant’s brain, they’d start to require oxygen and nutrients to keep themselves going. But once you’ve gone from a tiny “brain in a dish” to a larger organ with more and more of the stuff inside our skulls, it’s harder not to wonder if some lines should be drawn, he added.
12/1/17
Research led by Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, suggests that a now-extinct Chinese otter that roamed lakes or swamps was almost as large as a wolf and had jawbones capable of crushing large shells, as well as birds and mammals, making it a key predator in its ecosystem. The researchers developed a computer model to test their guess that jaw strength would depend on what foods the species prefers. "You don't need to chew fish, you just sort of bite on it and swallow," Tseng said.
11/9/17
An article in Newsweek about a new study that uses lab-grown mini-brains known as cerebral organoids to explain the effects of psychedelics on the human brain quotes Michal K. Stachowiak, PhD, professor of pathology and anatomical sciences in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. “It’s an interesting study, but I’m not sure the model was properly developed. I’m skeptical this model could or should be used to reflect a full adult human brain,” Stachowiak said.
10/27/17
An article about an institute that is building a library of 3D pictures of human nerve cells interviews Michal K. Stachowiak, PhD, professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, who said the database could eventually answer a central question by connecting genomic data with the pictures: what difference in a person’s genetic material can give rise to things like tumors and epilepsy? “It’s never been done,” he said. “And if you do it, you gain such vast information.”
10/13/17
An article on Kopitiam Bot, a news, lifestyle and technology website in Singapore, reports on research co-authored by Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, on a fossilized carnivore jawbone that belonged to a beardog, an early, long-extinct relative of dogs, foxes and weasels that lived up to 40 million years ago. “We’re not saying we’ve solved where they fit on the tree of life, but it’s the most progress that’s been made in quite a while. Our work provides a clearer connection between the rest of the beardog family and their evolutionary roots.”
6/30/17
Research by Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, suggests that otters may have migrated across America about 6 million years ago along the northern edge of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, which runs across Mexico. “This is an entirely new idea that no one else has proposed,” he said. “We think it’s very likely other animals utilized this route.”
4/19/17
A Science article about two male African lions that killed 35 people in 1898 and the longstanding debate over whether tooth decay caused the lions to begin eating human flesh, interviews Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences and a vertebrate paleontologist.
3/31/17
Research by Michal K. Stachowiak, PhD, professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, shows that a common genomic pathway lies at the root of schizophrenia and could be a step toward the design of treatments that could be administered to pregnant mothers at high risk of bearing a child with schizophrenia, potentially preventing the disease before it begins.
3/21/17
Smithsonian reports on how saber-toothed cats used their large fangs and quotes Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, who said: “The back and base of sabercat skulls tend to show very expanded and bulky bony areas for the attachment of large neck muscles.”
12/29/16
UB has released a list of 12 faculty-led research projects that caught the world’s attention in 2016, appearing in news articles around the world.
12/19/16
Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, has helped establish that a fossil that sat largely unnoticed in a drawer at Chicago’s Field Museum belonged to an extinct relative of dogs, foxes and weasels. The fossil represents a new genus, the taxonomic rank above species.
12/14/16
Research co-authored by Jack Tseng, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, focuses on a fossilized carnivore jawbone that belonged to a beardog, an early, long-extinct relative of dogs, foxes and weasels that lived up to 40 million years ago.
12/6/16
A newly described fossil skull from one of the largest of the saber-toothed cats is helping scientists understand the diversity of killing techniques used by these extinct and fearsome predators.