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Medical Students to Get Early Research Training with NIH Grant

student research

Published December 27, 2011

A new training grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will provide stipends for six UB medical students to participate in a 10-week mentored research project during the summer after their first year.

Stipends Available in May

“The grant addresses a growing concern about a decline in the number of physician scientists being trained in our country.”
Timothy F. Murphy, MD
Senior associate dean for clinical and translational research

The program begins in May; the application deadline is Feb. 22.

The T35 grant is funded by the NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. It was jointly awarded to the UB School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) and will support research in infectious diseases, microbiology and immunology.

Mentors Drawn from UB, Roswell Park

Students will be able to select mentors from a pool of 18 UB and RPCI faculty members who have active research programs and extensive mentoring experience.

The program will include:

  • a mentored research project
  • weekly seminar series
  • weekly laboratory practical session
  • training in the responsible conduct of research
  • oral presentations by students at the end of the program
  • poster presentations by students at an annual research day

Grant Aims to Increase Ranks of Physician-Scientists

“The grant addresses a growing concern about a decline in the number of physician scientists being trained in our country,” says Timothy F. Murphy, MD, senior associate dean for clinical and translational research.

Murphy is the grant’s co-principal investigator along with Kelvin Lee, MD, chair of the Department of Immunology and vice chair of the Department of Medicine at RPCI.

Surveys reveal that a mentored research experience during medical school influenced students who choose careers as physician-investigators.

“The broad goal of this training program is to attract talented and interested trainees into careers in academic medicine,” Murphy explains. “We will accomplish this by providing medical students with the opportunity to have a research experience early in their training.”