Murphy Named SUNY Distinguished Professor

Published May 19, 2011

Timothy F. Murphy, MD, senior associate dean for clinical and translational research, has been named a State University of New York Distinguished Professor, the highest faculty rank in the SUNY system.

Tim Murphy

Timothy Murphy, MD, has achieved the highest faculty rank in the SUNY system.

The distinguished professorship recognizes individuals who have achieved national or international prominence within their respective fields.

The SUNY Distinguished Professorship recognizes individuals who have achieved national or international prominence within their respective fields. The distinction is attained through significant contributions to the research literature, in Murphy’s case, or through artistic performance or achievement in the fine and performing arts.

Murphy was one of 26 SUNY faculty appointed a Distinguished Professor by the SUNY Board of Trustees.

An internationally-recognized expert in respiratory tract bacterial infections, Murphy specializes in research on pathogens responsible for ear infections, primarily in children, and on lower respiratory tract infections in adults with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). A goal of his research, which has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health since 1983, is to develop vaccines to prevent these infections, with specific outer membrane proteins being evaluated as potential vaccine antigens.

Director of the Buffalo Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Murphy is co-principal investigator on the longest-standing study of COPD, which is supported by a grant from the Department of Veterans Affairs. He is a professor in the Departments of Medicine and Microbiology and Immunology.

Along with Murphy, four other UB faculty members were named SUNY Distinguished Professors: Guyora Binder, JD, professor of law; Tony Conrad, BA, professor of media study; James Gardner, JD, vice dean for academic affairs and director of the Edwin F. Jaeckle Center for State and Local Democracy; and Cristanne Miller, PhD, professor and chair, Department of English.