Classnotes - 1940s

Robert Lloyd Segal, MD '47 writes, "Since for various reasons, including medical, I cannot attend my class reunion as much as I desired to be present, I though a note coverng the past 70 years would be appropriate.  After interning at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, I had a year of pathology at Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, NY under George Whipple.  Instead of practicing in Westchester (my home), I opted to chance it in New York City back at Sinai. I had an appointment after residency as a half-time position as a director of a small medical emergency room for one year. After that, an appointment to the visiting staff. I ended up within thyroid group, as Associate Attending in Medicine assigned to endocrinology. After Sinai became a Medical School, I had the title of Associate Clinical Professor.  Publications included an extensive study of iodine metabolism and clinical papers on thyroid disease. I have membership in the American Thyroid Association, endocrine society and ACE. I also had privileges and attending status at Bellevue Hospital (NYU) for 3 years and Lenox Hill Hospital until the time of retirement. I retired from the practice of Medicine in December of 2010.  I was married for the first time to a Wellesley graduate, Sydney Joy Joelson, on Valentine's Day of 1954. We had 4 children.  Tragically, our youngest son David and my wife both died in a fire in a rented house in East Hampton on December 29, 1969. As a sub note, Tony Oliveri introduced a bill, now law, that all rented houses (in NY) must have functioning fire detectors.  My three older daughters have gone into education. The oldest is Head of the Upper School at a prestigious private girls school (Brearley Academy). The second is a Full Professor at Harvard Medical School. Her research at Dana Farber is on neurology and neuro-oncology. She is in charge of the MD and PhD program there. The youngest works at Hunter as Director of a Business placement group.  My second marriage produced two more daughters (total 5 daughters).  I have 12 wonderful grandchildren."

Clare Shumway, MD ’48: "A favorite memory is stopping Roger Hubbard (the absent-minded professor) in the hallway one day to ask him a question. He answered me, and then asked: 'Which direction was I headed? If it’s this way, I’ve had lunch. If it’s the other way, I haven’t eaten yet.'"