Infectious Diseases

7/18/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, was quoted for a story on the importance of covering the entire hand when using sanitizer. “You get the palm side of your fingers. You’ll get your fingertips, but you won’t get the other side, or between the fingers and the outside of the thumbs. You have to make sure you get all those other parts,” he said.
7/15/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, is quoted in stories on the recently released guidelines about the safe fall semester return for UB students, faculty and staff. “We want everyone to adopt a culture that minimizes risks of getting infected and maximizes our ability to keep UB open,” Russo said. 
7/15/20
WGRZ-TV quoted Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, for its story on the recently released guidelines about the safe fall semester return for UB students, faculty and staff. “We want everyone to adopt a culture that minimizes risks of getting infected and maximizes our ability to keep UB open,” Russo said. 
7/14/20
While several states in the south and west are experiencing significant increases in the number of positive novel coronavirus cases, New York has managed to keep its numbers in check. Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, says the notable contrast is a testament to officials in New York taking a slow and deliberate approach to reopening while consistently urging residents to follow widely accepted public health procedures, such as wearing masks and practicing social distancing. 
7/14/20
John A. Sellick Jr., DO, professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases, is quoted in news outlets on imported cases of COVID-19 being documented in Monroe and Erie counties. “The problem is we don’t know if you have infection,” Sellick said. “Everybody’s saying, ‘I’m not infected.’ You might be infected. We don’t know that.”
7/14/20
John A. Sellick Jr., DO, professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases, was quoted in a story debunking the myth that mosquitoes can transmit the novel coronavirus. “People ask this all the time,” said Sellick. “Even if a mosquito were to bite someone who is infected, it would not be able to replicate the infection and transmit it to other people."
7/13/20
A story reporting on the increase in average daily fatalities due to COVID-19, which is beginning to put a strain on hospitals, quotes Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases. “As these cases increase at a significant rate, it’s going to catch up with everyone,” Russo said.
7/10/20
A story reporting that Erie County data shows an “alarming trend” of more young people being diagnosed with COVID-19 interviews Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases. “If there is a weak link in the chain, such as 20-year-olds and 30-year-olds not protecting themselves ... that eventually is going to put everyone at risk from a ripple effect,” he said.
7/10/20
Major League Ball (MLB) players took the field this week for the first time in months. The Sports Medicine Research and Testing Laboratory in Utah is responsible for running all of the league’s tests for COVID-19. Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, commented on how crucial any flaws are in the MLB testing program. “If you keep the number of infections down in your baseball community, then the weaknesses in the tests will be blunted if there’s fewer cases,” says Russo. “The ramifications of a 72-hour lag will be less.”
7/7/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, is interviewed for a story on the latest COVID-19 data for Western New York, which appears to show good progress in reducing hospitalizations. “I think this is due in large part to the strong culture that we’ve developed in employing public health measures such as mask usage, social distancing and hand hygiene.”
7/6/20
A story in Bustle about how to self-quarantine when visiting another state has an interview with Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, who explained the difference between isolation and quarantine. “If you are infected, you undergo isolation. If you have had close contact (with people who have COVID) but are not established to be infected, you undergo quarantine,” Russo said. People in quarantine should stay home, separate themselves from others, monitor their health, and follow directions from their state or local health department.
7/3/20
With coronavirus spiking in many parts of the country, Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, says it’s pivotal to listen to what your body may be trying to tell you, especially those small signs that you might have COVID-19. One hidden symptom a person is most likely to miss is fatigue. “A little fatigue could be mistaken for something else and you didn’t think a whole lot of it,” says Russo.
7/3/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, was interviewed on why bars and restaurants are potential hot spots for COVID-19. Bars are “logarithmically worse” than restaurants, he said, noting that people in bars tend to be clustered together, are more likely to shout and move around, and gain a higher risk tolerance as they drink.
7/3/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, is quoted in stories discussing safety risks for COVID-19 at pools. “The pool itself isn’t a risk — it’s the people around the pool and the interactions around the pool,” he says.
7/2/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, appeared in MarketWatch to discuss safety issues with dining indoors at restaurants. “Whenever there’s a scenario where everyone can wear masks at all times the risk is lower,” Russo said. “When eating you physically can’t wear a mask but you can minimize that risk by popping it back on between bites.” States like New York that have been hit particularly hard by the virus, are also planning to reopen schools in the fall and “want to start off the school year with the best possible conditions,” Russo said. “It’s already going to be dicey going into the school year and getting elementary students to wear masks is going to be hard, but it’s an important activity that’s much different than going into a restaurant indoors.”