Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition

6/13/19
An article about medical innovations being developed in Western New York interviews Adnan Siddiqui, MD, PhD, professor of neurosurgery, about the Tigertriever, which can be manipulated while inside a blood vessel to change in size and dimensions, and Anthony D. Martinez, MD, clinical associate professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, who discussed the FibroScan machine, which uses diagnostic imaging that takes about 10 minutes and can replace a more invasive, expensive and risky liver biopsy.
2/11/19
A perspective piece written by Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, describes a study that reported that low testosterone persists in men even after hepatitis C virus is cleared. “The study highlights the important relationships between common viral infections and male hypogonadism,” he wrote.
1/27/19
Articles focusing on next-generation leaders in the News’ annual Prospectus special section feature a number of individuals with UB connections, including: Anthony D. Martinez, MD, clinical associate professor of medicine in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and medical director of hepatology at Erie County Medical Center.
9/18/18
UB researchers have received a five-year, $3 million grant to apply the power of big data to enhance liver health in the region. Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine and co-principal investigator on the grant, said “clearly, it’s not an exaggeration to say that we are seeing a national crisis of liver disease and liver cancer.”
5/25/18
An article about the rapid revolution of technology-aided care that is available through remote patient monitoring interviews Anne B. Curtis, MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and chair of medicine; Ajay Chaudhuri, MD, clinical director of medicine and director of the endocrinology, metabolism and diabetes fellowship program; and Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition; about the devices that can reduce patients’ trips to the doctor’s office.
1/9/18
An article about research that showed that in patients with hepatitis C virus infection who were receiving opioid substitutes, interferon-free drug regimens yielded better outcomes compared with regimens that contained interferon, and reports that a related editorial co-authored by Andrew H. Talal, MD, MPH, professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, suggests that DAA efficacy should encourage people with substance use disorders to seek HCV treatment.
8/17/17
Ramon E. Rivera, MD, assistant professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, was interviewed about possible contamination of endoscopes used in colonoscopies performed at the Veterans Administration hospital in Buffalo. “The worst thing that could come out of this,” Rivera said, “would be for patients sitting at home saying ‘You know what? I won’t get my colonoscopy.’”
8/11/17
An article reports on research being conducted by Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, and two student researchers to find out if telemedicine can improve hepatitis C treatment for patients who take methadone and, if so, how it can work best. “This is a population that not only has been excluded from medical care but also from research,” Talal said.
7/28/17
CGTV News, an international news outlets with an audience of 1.2 billion people around the world, interviews Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, about World Hepatitis Day and research about the disease. “I think the progress in treatment has really been phenomenal,” he said. “The new therapies for hepatitis C have really been revolutionary, resulting in one pill once a day for the vast majority of patients, much shorter treatment duration, much easier to take and minimal side effects.”
7/7/17
An article about Hepatitis C and the new group of drugs that offer a 90 percent cure rate interviews Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine, who leads liver disease research at UB’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute. “We’re not only seeing the fact that the older generation is dying of cirrhosis and increased liver cancer in larger numbers, but just when we thought we were going to get rid of this disease because we have these new therapies, now we’ve got all these young people coming in with Hepatitis C,” he said.
5/30/17
A study of patients with irritable bowel syndrome showed that many factors that contribute to patient satisfaction are beyond the doctor’s control. "Patient satisfaction is a significant metric that impacts reimbursement as health care emphasizes the value of care not the volume of care," said Jeffrey M. Lackner, PsyD, professor of medicine.
5/12/17
An editorial by Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine, looks at the difficulties of screening, diagnosing and treating individuals infected with the hepatitis C virus who also have substance use disorders. “People with substance use disorders can account for as much as 80 percent of infected individuals in developed countries, a direct result of the opioid epidemic in the U.S.,” he said.
2/6/17
Andrew H. Talal, MD, MPH, professor of medicine, talks about the sharp rise in hepatitis C in young adults that officials are blaming on the opioid epidemic.
11/1/16
Thomas C. Mahl, MD, professor of medicine and chief of gastroenterology at the Buffalo VA Medical Center, discusses liver diseases and says many people with hepatitis C are not aware they have it. Mahl directs the gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition fellowshipBrian Clemency, DO, associate professor of emergency medicine and director of the emergency medicine services fellowship, gives advice on preparations for end-of-life care.
9/24/16
Anthony D. Martinez, MD, clinical associate professor of medicine, is interviewed about hepatology, the medical field that deals with the liver, and, specifically, about new treatments for hepatitis C that have a 100 percent cure rate.