Media Coverage

10/2/19
Technology.org reports that UB researchers will study the nutrition practices of emergency medical service workers. The study will examine the on- and off-duty eating habits of EMS providers. The goal is to shed light on the chronic health conditions among EMS compared to the public. Brian Clemency, DO, associate professor of emergency medicine and director of the EMS fellowship in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, and David P. Hostler III, PhD, professor and chair of exercise and nutrition sciences in the School of Public Health and Health Professions and  clinical professor of emergency medicine in the Jacobs School, are co-authors of the study. The story was also picked up by EMS1.
9/30/19
News accounts detailed the state Department of Health announcing that it will launch the Buffalo Medication Assisted Treatment and Emergency Referrals, or Buffalo MATTERS, program across New York, and interview Joshua J. Lynch, DO, clinical assistant professor of emergency medicine, who developed the program with others in the Department of Medicine. “If somebody comes in with chest pain, we would never just blow them off and send them home,” he said. “That’s what we used do that for patients with opioid-use disorder. I think we’ve wholeheartedly now realized in the medical community that this is a potentially life-threatening chronic disease.”
9/12/19
Research by Brian Clemency, DO, associate professor of emergency medicine in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, and David P. Hostler III, PhD, professor and chair of exercise and nutrition sciences in UB's School of Public Health and Health Professions, will study the nutrition habits of emergency medical workers.
6/3/19
Anthony J. Billittier, MD, clinical associate professor of emergency medicine, has joined Independent Health as executive vice president and chief medical officer, effective June 10.
5/7/19
Joshua J. Lynch, DO, clinical assistant professor of emergency medicine, is interviewed for an article about mixed opinions of the HEALing Communities Study, the Trump administration’s newest plan to fight the opioid crisis by making $350 million available as grants to hospitals or universities to support community partnerships. “The concept of the HEALing Communities study appears promising,” he said. “By aiming to better understand the needs of many communities and working to specifically reduce opioid deaths, this study seems better than others the Trump administration has proposed.”
2/4/19
According to findings by Brian Clemency, DO, associate professor of emergency medicine and director of the emergency medical services fellowship, patients treated with naloxone in the emergency room can be safely released following positive findings of six evaluation criteria. The study, published in Academic Emergency Medicine, was the first to clinically assess and validate a rule regarding the length of observation time necessary before opioid overdose patients can be safely discharged from an emergency department.
1/19/19
Brian Clemency, DO, associate professor of emergency medicine and emergency medical services fellowship director, was interviewed on the podcast “The Skeptics’ Guide to Emergency Medicine.” He discussed findings from a recently published paper concluding that the St. Paul’s Early Discharge Rule may be used to risk stratify patients for early discharge following naloxone administration for suspected opioid overdose.
1/15/19
Research by Brian Clemency, DO, associate professor of emergency medicine, has found that opioid use patients who have been treated with naloxone for overdose and who meet certain clinical criteria can be safely discharged from an emergency department within an hour after treatment.
12/15/18
Research by Brian Clemency, DO, associate professor of emergency medicine, found that opioid use patients who have been treated with naloxone for overdose and who meet certain clinical criteria can be safely discharged from the Emergency Department within an hour after treatment.
12/7/18
BlueCross BlueShield has awarded $2.7 million in grant funding to nine health-based projects across Western New York, including $200,000 to the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences for the expansion of emergency access to medication-assisted treatment for patients with opioid-use disorder as well as rapid referral to long-term treatment.
9/12/18
An article about new standardized prescribing guidelines adopted last summer by local emergency department doctors dealing with opioid addiction interviews Robert F. McCormack, MD, professor and chair of emergency medicine, who said expanded relationships between the hospitals and clinics has been key. “The truly unique part here is the warm handoff,” McCormack said. “We had enough consensus to say yes, this is the right thing to do, and people bought into that. The idea is this wasn’t putting new services out there; this was coordinating competing services.” Joshua J. Lynch, DO, clinical assistant professor of emergency medicine, and Gale R. Burstein, MD, Erie County commissioner of public health and clinical professor of pediatrics, were also interviewed in the article.
8/28/18
An opinion piece in the Buffalo News about the “very rare” use of buprenorphine in the emergency room of a California hospital to treat opioid-addicted patients noted that it is not rare in Western New York, where the practice was initiated by Joshua J. Lynch, DO, clinical assistant professor of emergency medicine in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. “Lynch knows that opioid addiction is a chronic disease requiring immediate aggressive treatment and management and therefore initiated a protocol of administering Suboxone at the time of ER treatment. But he didn’t stop there. He enlisted the help of his department chairman and emergency medicine colleagues. Recognizing that access to follow-up care was a problem, he approached local clinics and asked that they hold open appointment times for patients in crisis,” the article notes.
7/2/18
Research by Heidi N. Suffoletto, MD, clinical assistant professor of emergency medicine and orthopaedics, found that wearable technologies designed to track and improve staffing levels in hospital emergency rooms can be helpful, but must be judiciously chosen.
2/1/18
A UB study shows that, instead of immediately transporting a patient to the hospital, patients are more likely to survive a heart attack when first responders stay on the scene to focus on high-quality cardiac pulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation. “When a patient collapses from cardiac arrest in the community, the chance they will survive is low to begin with. But their chances get even worse if emergency medical services providers automatically try to take the patient to the hospital, rather than maximizing their care on scene,” said Brian Clemency, DO, associate professor of emergency medicine.
12/3/17
An opinion piece by Brian Clemency, DO, associate professor of emergency medicine, looks at the new ways emergency medical technicians and paramedics are being taught to treat cardiac arrest in order to improve survival rates. “Our providers immediately perform life-saving interventions rather than delay or hinder the delivery of those interventions by moving the patient. Most importantly, this has enabled our providers to center resuscitative efforts around the delivery of high-quality, uninterrupted chest compressions and prompt defibrillation,” he writes.