Media Coverage

12/14/17
UB’s Research Institute on Addictions is leading a statewide program to train medical professionals in high-need regions, including Erie and Niagara counties, in providing medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction. “Once you get trained, it's not an easy transition to getting your first patient. And, once you are treating patients, you have to make sure they are monitored. That can be difficult, especially if you are a single provider,” said Kenneth E. Leonard, PhD, RIA director and research professor of psychiatry.
12/1/17
Steven L. Dubovsky, MD, professor and chair of psychiatry, talks about the mass shootings occurring around the country and the growing feelings of fear and loss that are affecting people as a result. He said people can empower themselves by asking what things they can actively do to keep themselves and their communities safe. “That way, you won’t feel like you’re passively waiting,” he said. “You will feel less anxious and more in control.”
11/9/17
After a gunman fired 20 rounds of ammunition at a Dollar General store in Cheektowaga, Steven L. Dubosky, MD, professor and chair of psychiatry, was interviewed about the issue of mass shootings. “It’s not a gun-control issue, and it’s not a mental health issue either,” he said. “It’s a bad behavior issue.”
11/7/17
Michael R. Cummings, MD, assistant professor of psychiatry, co-authored an editorial that argued the community should be able to talk about mental illness in the same way people talk about any medical condition.
10/16/17
An article about the extensive coverage of the Las Vegas shooter and concerns that it will lead to copycats who will use the tragedy as a template for their own horrific schemes interviews Steven L. Dubovsky, MD, professor and chair of psychiatry. “I would not see new mass murderers as copycats so much as competitors who are attempting to best the record of the previous murder and get more air time. The motivation for many of these horrible acts is not psychiatric — it is simply a desire to feel famous, powerful and influential,” he said.
10/8/17
A story on WIVB-TV reports a new state grant will help UB train physicians and nurses on how to medically treat people addicted to opioids, and interviews Kenneth E. Leonard, PhD, professor of psychiatry and director of UB’s Research Institute on Addictions, who said doctors and nurses need to be properly trained to distribute an FDA-approved medication that is available on the market. “Buprenorphine is one of the medication-assisted treatments that is used for … prescription opioids and heroin,” he said.
9/28/17
A new state grant will help UB train physicians and nurses on how to medically treat people who are addicted to opioids. “Buprenorphine helps alleviate the craving people who are addicted to opiates feel,” said Kenneth E. Leonard, PhD, professor of psychiatry and director of UB’s Research Institute on Addictions. “It must be part of a full set of psychological and social interventions, ideally with professionals at chemical dependency treatment centers.”
7/31/17
A new study has that found that one in three in the American adult population used some form of prescription painkiller in 2015. “We’ve all known for some time that there's been a problem with opiates and there’'s been this increase in the number of opiate prescriptions. But the sheer number of people who are receiving prescriptions in 2015, which this study is based on, was staggering and very surprising,” said Kenneth E. Leonard, PhD, professor of psychiatry and director of UB’s Research Institute on Addictions.
6/19/17
An article about a report from the Los Angeles coroner’s office that found that Carrie Fisher had multiple drugs in her system when she died after suffering a heart attack in December interviews Kenneth E. Leonard, PhD, director of UB’s Research Institute on Addictions and professor of psychiatry, who said drugs and alcohol have the capacity to change the structure of the brain so that they become more appealing and more important to the user. “And these changes are long-lasting,” he said.
6/6/17
A story on work stress and a new survey that suggests that a growing number of Americans are not making use of their vacation time interviews Steven L. Dubovsky, MD, professor and chair of psychiatry, who said it is vital to create a work/life balance and to make the most of time off and vacation time. “If you've taken that down time, you'll be more effective at the job you do. Pretending that 'if I just keep going I can do anything' it's a deception. There's nobody that is that powerful or that effective... you're just kidding yourself,” he said.
4/12/17
A walking tour of a Buffalo East Side community by students from the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences was designed to provide a better understanding of real life issues the students will encounter when they begin working directly with patients in their third year during clinical rotations.  
3/26/17
A report on the work of the Western New York Center for Survivors of Refugee Trauma and Torture, the only program of its kind outside of New York City, quotes Kim Griswold, MD, MPH, the center’s medical director and an associate professor of family medicine and psychiatry.
1/23/17
UB faculty are part of a Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra performance of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony. Among those making presentations are Linda F. Pessar, MD, professor of psychiatry and director of the Center for Medical Humanities in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. “My focus will be on Beethoven's remarkable resiliency that led him to turn away from suicide, despite the social isolation and threat to his musical creativity that deafness represented,” Pessar said.
1/5/17
Steven L. Dubovsky, MD, professor and chair of psychiatry, talks about the psychology of hate crimes and why they take place and notes hate crimes are on the rise.
11/21/16
More middle school students are dying of suicide than car crashes. In 2014, 425 young people between the ages of 10-14 in the United States took their own lives compared to 384 who died in car accidents. Michael R. Cummings, MD, assistant professor of clinical psychiatry, says parents should have “open, honest, frank discussions” about teen suicide with their children. “You will not make your child suicidal by saying the word suicide,” he emphasizes.