Media Coverage

5/15/18
New Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences research has shown that an approved anti-cancer drug can significantly restore the social deficits associated with autism spectrum disorder in mice. “We have discovered a small molecule compound that shows a profound and prolonged effect on autism-like social deficits without obvious side effects, while many currently used compounds for treating a variety of psychiatric diseases have failed to exhibit the therapeutic efficacy for this core symptom of autism,” said Zhen Yan, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of physiology and biophysics.
4/3/18
New research by Zhen Yan, PhD, professor of physiology and biophysics, has shown that an FDA-approved anti-cancer drug can significantly restore the social deficits associated with autism spectrum disorder in mice.
1/31/18
News articles report that Cytocybernetics, a UB spinoff co-founded by two Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences faculty, has been awarded $1.5 million by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which will support hiring and development. The company was founded by Glenna C. Bett, PhD, vice chair for research and associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and Randall L. Rasmusson, PhD, professor of physiology and biophysics.
6/27/17
Zhen Yan, PhD, and Jian Feng, PhD, both professors of physiology and biophysics, have received a five-year, $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to conduct preclinical research on the genetic and epigenetic factors that cause Alzheimer’s disease. “We hypothesize that Alzheimer’s is produced by a combination of genetic risk factors and environmental factors, such as aging,” said Yan, “that induce the dysregulation of specific epigenetic processes that, in turn, lead to impaired cognition.”
6/7/17
Jian Feng, PhD, professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics, is paving the way for faster screenings for new treatments for Parkinson's disease. “With this new finding, we can now generate in a dish the neuronal misfiring that is similar to what occurs in the brain of a Parkinson’s patient,” says Feng.
6/7/17
Research by Jian Feng, PhD, professor of physiology and biophysics, has resulted in faster ways to screen for new treatments for Parkinson's disease. “With this new finding, we can now generate in a dish the neuronal misfiring that is similar to what occurs in the brain of a Parkinson's patient,” said Feng. “A variety of studies and drug discovery efforts can be implemented on these human neurons to speed up the discovery of a cure for Parkinson's disease.”
6/7/17
Jian Feng, PhD, professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics, has found a faster way to screen for new treatments for Parkinson's disease. "With this new finding, we can now generate in a dish the neuronal misfiring that is similar to what occurs in the brain of a Parkinson's patient. A variety of studies and drug discovery efforts can be implemented on these human neurons to speed up the discovery of a cure for Parkinson's disease," said Feng.
12/9/16
A study by researchers in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology finds exercise, coupled with methamphetamine, may help recovery of those addicted to the drug and increase their odds of avoiding relapse. Margarita L. Dubocovich, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and chair of pharmacology and toxicology, is senior author. Randall Hudson, PhD, research professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics, is a co-author.
12/1/16
Along with other researchers, Mark D. Parker, PhD, assistant professor of physiology and biophysics, has proposed a single, unifying model for an elusive membrane transport protein involved in a rare hereditary condition that results in vision loss. A doctoral candidate in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics is first author of the research, which has been published in the American Journal of Physiology — Cell Physiology.
11/22/16
Frederick Sachs, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of physiology and biophysics, has been working with spider venom since the mid-1980’s. His research has led to a developing drug that combats the symptoms of muscular dystrophy at the core genetic level. Based on scientific data in pre-clinical trials, the drug was linked to a 40 percent increase in mobility and other effects the disease has on the body.
6/8/16
Parkinson’s disease patients are using boxing to improve their physical and cognitive function.
5/27/16
Health & Tech, a regular feature highlighting life sciences and high-tech companies throughout the region, reports on Cytocybernetics, a company founded by Glenna C. Bett, PhD, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and Randall L. Rasmusson, PhD, professor of physiology and biophysics, that has developed a technology they say can cut the time and money needed to bring new drugs to market.
2/18/16
Judges at the 43North business plan competition were impressed with the science behind Cytocybernetics, one of the winners of $500,000 in the competition for startups. The company — created by Glenna C. Bett, PhD, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and Randall L. Rasmusson, PhD, professor of physiology and biophysics — is developing biotechnology that could halve the time and money needed to bring new drugs to the market.
1/25/16
Research by Jian Feng, PhD, professor of physiology and biophysics, has identified a key obstacle in the cell conversion process, a breakthrough that has big implications for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, allowing scientists to create functional neurons to replace those damaged by the condition. 
1/20/16
Zhen Yan, PhD, professor of physiology and biophysics, has received a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Mental Health to study the impact of stress on cognition and mental function.