Media Coverage

6/21/19
Linda M. Harris, MD, professor of surgery, answers questions about building her vascular medicine career in Buffalo. She explains why it is important to raise awareness about women and vascular disease and gives insight into why it was challenging to train with so few women in her field. She also discusses the medical training opportunities in Buffalo. “We hear from trainees that they don’t realize how good we have it here until they go to a boot camp and meet colleagues from around the country,” she says. “I came here for my training, with no intent to stay in Buffalo, but I fell in love with the city,” she adds.
6/21/19
Along with his collaborators, Sikandar Z. Khan, MD, has found that among patients who had endovascular interventions for critical limb ischemia (CLI), those taking ACE inhibitors had higher rates of overall and amputation-free survival than those not taking them. “Our study shows that these drugs are associated with improved amputation-free survival and overall survival,” explains Khan, who is a clinical assistant professor of surgery.
6/18/19
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center is partnering with a San Diego firm to develop a new way to see and treat cancer tumors. The work is led by Joseph Skitzki, MD, clinical assistant professor of surgery. Skitzki says the technology allows researchers to modify a tumor and make it express signals that attract an immune response. He is hopeful that it will improve patients’ response to immunotherapies and longer-lasting responses.
5/28/19
Linda M. Harris, MD, professor of surgery and program director of the vascular surgery integrated residency and vascular surgery fellowship, is interviewed in a story about the first annual women’s vascular summit and how vascular diseases differ among men and women in symptoms and how treatments may be impacted by health care views of gender. “Back (when I was training as a doctor), a lot of vascular disease was not thought to occur in women. So if I had gone to an emergency room 10-15 years ago with chest pains and you went to the emergency room with the same chest pains, they would have assessed you for heart attack and they would have said that I either had reflux or anxiety or a panic attack,” she said.
5/18/19
The UB Drone STEM competition held at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences featured local high school students competing to demonstrate skills from flying a drone simulator to completing peg transfers using minimally invasive laproscopic tools. “Some of these skills are the exact same skills that surgical residents in training do to become board certified surgeons and are required before they can go out into practice,” said Steven D. Schwaitzberg, MD, professor and chair of surgery.
4/5/19
The Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences is teaming with Mariner Endosurgery to test a new 3D surgical navigation system. “This cutting-edge navigation system brings surgeons unprecedented 3D spatial awareness during minimally invasive abdominal procedures,” said Stephen D. Schwaitzberg, MD, professor and chair of surgery. “The potential to expand this to other types of surgery is intriguing as well.”
3/8/19
Philip L. Glick, MD, MBA, professor of surgery and director of UB’s MD-MBA Dual Degree Program, authored an opinion piece. “The Jacobs School realizes what additional skill sets our students need to succeed in the current complex medical profession and are truly preparing all of our students to be tomorrow’s leaders,” he writes.
2/16/19
John B. Ortolani, MD, assistant professor of surgery, is interviewed for an article about genetic testing and what it can tell individuals about their future health risks. Ortolani said a thorough family health history can help genetic counselors decide if testing is warranted and, should a positive test for mutations result, if specialists need to set up more frequent health screenings.
2/6/19
Twenty-five health care professionals were chosen for the inaugural Excellence in Health Care Awards. Faculty members in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences include Timothy M. Adams, MD, clinical assistant professor of surgery; John L. Butsch, MD, clinical assistant professor of surgery; Elad I. Levy, MD, professor and chair of neurosurgery; Steven D. Schwaitzberg, MD, professor and chair of surgery; Fuad H. Sheriff, clinical assistant professor of medicine.
10/9/18
Kathryn Bass, MD, clinical associate professor of surgery, was interviewed about a local child who suffered second-degree deep and partial burns over about 12 percent of her body and was successfully treated with amnion stem cells interviews. Bass treated the child and has written five peer-reviewed medical papers about how to use cell therapy on child burns. “I haven’t done a split-thickness skin graft in two years,” she said. “Tissue regeneration – understanding stem cell biology – opens up a whole new world of medicine.”
8/29/18
Endovascular Today featured a question-and-answer interview with Linda M. Harris, MD, professor of surgery and program director of vascular surgery integrated residency and vascular surgery fellowship in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. She told about her tenure as past president of the Eastern Vascular Society, how to improve diversity in the field, mentoring the next generation of vascular surgeons and updates in endovascular techniques and technology. She said: “Working with medical students, residents and fellows at my own institution has allowed me to empower many young physicians. The amazing thing is that some of the best and brightest trainees are often some of the most unassuming and humble people you will ever meet.”
8/17/18
An article about a local couple who in the past two years has seen three of their four children return to Buffalo to live features John B. Ortolani, MD, assistant professor of surgery, who attended the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, then moved to Roanoke, Virginia, and Shreveport, Louisiana, before returning to Buffalo in 2017.
5/30/18
Business First reports on how the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences’ RISE (Research, Innovation, Surgical Simulation, Education) initiative is taking a unique approach to teaching anatomy and quotes John E. Tomaszewski, MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and the Peter A. Nickerson, PhD, Chair of the Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, and Steven D. Schwaitzberg, MD, professor and chair of the Department of Surgery.
4/29/18
In a story about robotic surgery in the magazine In Good Health, Steven D. Schwaitzberg, MD, professor and chair of surgery, talks about which procedures are good candidates for robotic surgery, noting “It really helps the surgeon focus on cases that depend on exact precision. Cancers that are in the lower pelvis region are perfect examples because the robotic arms allow for better movement in that location.”
3/12/18
Steven Schwaitzberg, MD, chair of surgery, discusses healthcare and the opportunities and progress being made in Buffalo on Invest Buffalo Niagara's podcast.