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Family Medicine in the News

8/11/17
An article on the opioid epidemic in Western New York interviews Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine and vice chair of addiction medicine, who said that when Prescription Monitoring Programs started to take effect, a vast population of addicts began turning to heroin. “When doctors stopped prescribing licit drugs to these patients, they turned to the illicit market where diverted prescription drugs and highly potent illegal drugs were becoming more available at lower costs,” he said.
7/20/17
Buffalo is home to the nation’s first opioid crisis intervention court, which can get users into treatment within hours of their arrest instead of days. The program is funded by a three-year, $300,000 grant from the U.S. Justice Department, which pays for a coordinator and case managers from UB Family Medicine, who enforce curfews, do wellness checks and transport patients.
7/7/17
Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine and vice chair of addiction medicine, and Torin J. Finver, MD, clinical instructor of family medicine and program director for the addiction medicine fellowship, were interviewed about a proposal that would send those going through opiate withdrawal home to detoxify. “It is an interesting concept that should be funded. However, it would be important to also collect data to evaluate its effectiveness in the real world,” Blondell said.  
6/7/17
Getting a handle on the opioid epidemic can be accomplished, but it will take time and it won't be easy, according to Richard Blondell, MD, a professor in the Department of Family Medicine. Blondell spoke on the topic at Genesee Community College in Batavia as part of an opioids and addiction seminar, hosted by the Genesee Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse.
6/7/17
Match Day, when medical students find out where they will do their clinical training, was an anxious one for international medical students headed to Buffalo due to the president's travel ban. Roseanne C. Berger, MD, senior associate dean for graduate medical education, and Christopher P. Schaeffer, MD, assistant professor of medicine, were both featured in the piece.
5/30/17
New medication-assisted treatment programs are opening up across Central New York to keep up with the opioid epidemic. “There’s a basic need for education support that draws people together and how that occurs might vary from one city to or another,” said Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine and vice chair for addiction medicine.
5/15/17
Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine and vice chair of addiction medicine was asked about the story of an Ohio police officer who overdosed and needed to be treated with Narcan after touching some fentanyl with his bare hand. Blondell said it’s not possible to overdose on fentanyl simply by touching it, although it’s theoretically possible that someone could overdose by touching carfentanyl, a much more potent version of the drug.  
5/12/17
Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine and vice chair of addiction medicine has strong opinions about the opioid epidemic. “The bulk of addiction is now created by the health care system,” he said. “This is an artificial epidemic. It’s the unintended consequences of aggressive pain management.”
5/5/17
David M. Holmes, MD, clinical associate professor of family medicine, along with medical students and residents, traveled to Panama to provide medical care to people living in remote villages. “The village is so remote, that we had to unload the vans, and then carry the medical equipment into the village,” he said.
4/27/17
Andrew B. Symons, MD, clinical associate professor of family medicine, was one of the speakers at an event announcing that $16 million in state funding has been earmarked for Western New York to fight the heroin and opioid crisis.
4/21/17
David M. Holmes, MD, clinical associate professor of family medicine and director of global health education, recently led a group of UB medical students and residents on a medical mission to Panama. The team worked with Floating Doctors, an organization that travels by boat to remote villages to provide medical care.
3/26/17
A report on the work of the Western New York Center for Survivors of Refugee Trauma and Torture, the only program of its kind outside of New York City, quotes Kim Griswold, MD, MPH, the center’s medical director and an associate professor of family medicine and psychiatry.
2/21/17
An article on providing clinical experiences early in medical education quotes Andrew B. Symons, MD, clinical associate professor and vice chair for medical student education in the Department of Family Medicine, who describes UB’s Clinical Practice of Medicine course where students are matched with a local clinician within a month of coming to medical school.
2/10/17
Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine and vice chair of addiction medicine, spoke at a Hilbert College symposium concerning the opioid epidemic.
2/7/17
A story on UB HEALS, a street medicine outreach program conducted by medical students that makes rounds on Tuesdays and Thursdays to offer preventive care to Buffalo’s homeless, interviews medical student Moudi Hubeishy and others involved in the program, including Kim Griswold, MD, MPH, associate professor of family medicine.