University at Buffalo - The State University of New York
Skip to Content

Family Medicine in the News

6/7/17
Getting a handle on the opioid epidemic can be accomplished, but it will take time and it won't be easy, according to Richard Blondell, MD, a professor in the Department of Family Medicine. Blondell spoke on the topic at Genesee Community College in Batavia as part of an opioids and addiction seminar, hosted by the Genesee Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse.
6/7/17
Match Day, when medical students find out where they will do their clinical training, was an anxious one for international medical students headed to Buffalo due to the president's travel ban. Roseanne C. Berger, MD, senior associate dean for graduate medical education, and Christopher P. Schaeffer, MD, assistant professor of medicine, were both featured in the piece.
5/30/17
New medication-assisted treatment programs are opening up across Central New York to keep up with the opioid epidemic. “There’s a basic need for education support that draws people together and how that occurs might vary from one city to or another,” said Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine and vice chair for addiction medicine.
5/15/17
Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine and vice chair of addiction medicine was asked about the story of an Ohio police officer who overdosed and needed to be treated with Narcan after touching some fentanyl with his bare hand. Blondell said it’s not possible to overdose on fentanyl simply by touching it, although it’s theoretically possible that someone could overdose by touching carfentanyl, a much more potent version of the drug.  
5/12/17
Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine and vice chair of addiction medicine has strong opinions about the opioid epidemic. “The bulk of addiction is now created by the health care system,” he said. “This is an artificial epidemic. It’s the unintended consequences of aggressive pain management.”
5/5/17
David M. Holmes, MD, clinical associate professor of family medicine, along with medical students and residents, traveled to Panama to provide medical care to people living in remote villages. “The village is so remote, that we had to unload the vans, and then carry the medical equipment into the village,” he said.
4/27/17
Andrew B. Symons, MD, clinical associate professor of family medicine, was one of the speakers at an event announcing that $16 million in state funding has been earmarked for Western New York to fight the heroin and opioid crisis.
4/21/17
David M. Holmes, MD, clinical associate professor of family medicine and director of global health education, recently led a group of UB medical students and residents on a medical mission to Panama. The team worked with Floating Doctors, an organization that travels by boat to remote villages to provide medical care.
3/26/17
A report on the work of the Western New York Center for Survivors of Refugee Trauma and Torture, the only program of its kind outside of New York City, quotes Kim Griswold, MD, MPH, the center’s medical director and an associate professor of family medicine and psychiatry.
2/21/17
An article on providing clinical experiences early in medical education quotes Andrew B. Symons, MD, clinical associate professor and vice chair for medical student education in the Department of Family Medicine, who describes UB’s Clinical Practice of Medicine course where students are matched with a local clinician within a month of coming to medical school.
2/10/17
Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine and vice chair of addiction medicine, spoke at a Hilbert College symposium concerning the opioid epidemic.
2/7/17
A story on UB HEALS, a street medicine outreach program conducted by medical students that makes rounds on Tuesdays and Thursdays to offer preventive care to Buffalo’s homeless, interviews medical student Moudi Hubeishy and others involved in the program, including Kim Griswold, MD, MPH, associate professor of family medicine.
11/18/16
A report by the U.S. Surgeon General said the county’s addiction epidemic is “one of America’s most pressing public health concerns.” Western New York has seen its impact; as of November 2016, 296 people died in 2016 from suspected opioid related overdoses, according to the Erie County Department of Health. “We have to look at these people as damaged individuals and offer them hope and help,” says addictions expert Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine. “Not judgment and ridicule.”
11/1/16
The University at Buffalo aims to recruit more participants in its clinical trials by working with a group of patients led by Laurene M. Tumiel Berhalter, PhD, associate professor of family medicine and director of community translational research. According to SUNY Distinguished Professor Timothy F. Murphy, MD, senior associate dean for clinical and translational research, people in the community should be involved in all phases of clinical research. Additionally, Peter L. Elkin, MD, professor and chair of biomedical informatics and professor of internal medicine, has developed a cell phone application that helps patients access information about available clinical trials.
9/16/16
Several news outlets reported on the work of UB addictions researcher Richard D. Blondell, MD, professor of family medicine and vice chair of addiction medicine, in getting addiction medicine recognized as a sub-specialty for doctors by the American Board of Medical Specialties.