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Media Coverage

8/15/17
A new study has found that heart failure patients who took aspirin daily were not at higher risk of being hospitalized for, or dying from, heart failure. Susan Graham, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, who worked on the study, said heart patients — and older adults in general — are often taking many prescription drugs at any given time. “That speaks to the importance of studying potential drug interactions,” she said. “We have to stay on our toes to make sure that we’re doing the right thing.”
8/15/17
Bruce R. Troen, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, and Kenneth L. Seldeen, PhD, research assistant professor of medicine, have concluded a preclinical study that showed that brief periods of intense physical activity can be safely administered at an advanced age, and that this kind of activity has the potential to reverse frailty. “We know that being frail or being at risk for becoming frail puts people at increased risk of dying and comorbidity,” Troen said. “These results show that it’s possible that high-intensity interval training can help enhance quality of life and capacity to be healthy.”
8/11/17
An article reports on research being conducted by Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, and two student researchers to find out if telemedicine can improve hepatitis C treatment for patients who take methadone and, if so, how it can work best. “This is a population that not only has been excluded from medical care but also from research,” Talal said.
8/9/17
Umesh Sharma, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine, has received a grant of $1 million from the National Institutes of Health to continue work on a study involving heart failure after a heart attack.
7/31/17
Timothy F. Murphy, MD, PHD, senior associate dean of clinical and translational research, authored a blog post on the American Federation of Teachers website about how Washington’s anti-science sentiment will hurt research funding for NIH. He writes: “…what a loss. Not only are we losing research dollars and the life-changing science they can fund, we are losing the best and brightest who could come up with as yet unimaginable solutions to some of our thorniest biomedical challenges.”
7/28/17
CGTV News, an international news outlets with an audience of 1.2 billion people around the world, interviews Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, about World Hepatitis Day and research about the disease. “I think the progress in treatment has really been phenomenal,” he said. “The new therapies for hepatitis C have really been revolutionary, resulting in one pill once a day for the vast majority of patients, much shorter treatment duration, much easier to take and minimal side effects.”
7/20/17
Research by Abhishek Sawant, a fellow in the Department of Medicine, has showed the benefits of performing percutaneous coronary intervention to clear blocked blood vessels in the hearts in people age 90 and older. “We did show that patients who had lower risk and underwent this procedure actually did very well,” he said.
7/20/17
Bruce R. Troen, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, led a study that used geriatric mice that ran on treadmills to learn whether abbreviated, intense workouts may help people of any age become healthier. “The animals had tolerated the high-intensity interval training well,” despite their advanced ages, he said, noting that interval training has a signature advantage. “You get done so quickly.”
7/12/17
A UB study used geriatric mice that ran on treadmills to learn whether abbreviated, intense workouts may help people of any age become healthier. Bruce R. Troen, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, conducted the study. “The animals had tolerated the high-intensity interval training well,” despite their advanced ages, he said, noting that interval training has a signature advantage. “You get done so quickly.”
7/11/17
A global cardiology conference held in Vancouver featured two doctors from the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences: Anne B. Curtis, MD, Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and chair and SUNY Distinguished Professor of medicine, discussed improved care for atrial fibrillation and guidelines involving the condition, and Michael E. Cain, MD, vice president for health sciences and dean of the medical school, chaired a session on cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death, and spoke on new electrocardiographic predictors of sudden cardiac death.
7/7/17
An article about Hepatitis C and the new group of drugs that offer a 90 percent cure rate interviews Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine, who leads liver disease research at UB’s Clinical and Translational Research Center. “We’re not only seeing the fact that the older generation is dying of cirrhosis and increased liver cancer in larger numbers, but just when we thought we were going to get rid of this disease because we have these new therapies, now we’ve got all these young people coming in with Hepatitis C,” he said.
7/2/17
In an article about the risks of scaling back Medicaid, medical policy expert Nancy H. Nielsen, MD, PhD, senior associate dean for health policy, said: “We need to address the cost of medical care in this country and bring it more in line with the results in other countries,” and added that “you don't address that by going after the neediest.”
6/7/17
A new smartphone device can be used to monitor patients with heart conditions. "It's convenient and not obtrusive to patients, and they can keep it for months," said Anne B. Curtis, MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and chair of the Department of Medicine and SUNY Distinguished Professor.
6/7/17
Nancy Nielsen, MD, PhD, was among many health care experts in Western New York who are opposed to the bill that House Republicans passed earlier this month that could cost New York State about $7 billion a year, while leaving thousands of state residents uninsured. "It's a bad bill for many reasons," said Nielsen, clinical professor of internal medicine and a former president of the American Medical Association, which also opposes the bill.
5/30/17
A study of patients with irritable bowel syndrome showed that many factors that contribute to patient satisfaction are beyond the doctor’s control. "Patient satisfaction is a significant metric that impacts reimbursement as health care emphasizes the value of care not the volume of care," said Jeffrey M. Lackner, PsyD, professor of medicine.