Media Coverage

7/10/20
Emergency medicine researchers — including Brian Clemency, DO — have launched a study to see if a steroid medication typically used to treat asthma can help patients with COVID-19. “Some people with viruses or other illnesses feel better sooner, faster with these kinds of medicines, so our hope in this case is that it will be helpful too,” says Clemency, associate professor of emergency medicine. Sanjay Sethi, MD — professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine — helped Clemency set up the study in the region.
7/7/20
A story reporting on a New York State-issued report stating that New York’s nursing home admission policy wasn’t to blame for nursing home COVID-19 deaths interviews Nancy H. Nielsen, MD, PhD, clinical professor of medicine and senior associate dean for health policy. “My concern about the report is that it says it’s the major driver, it was a driver and clearly was the initial driver. But whether it was the only driver I think is really not so clear,” she says.
7/7/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, is interviewed for a story on the latest COVID-19 data for Western New York, which appears to show good progress in reducing hospitalizations. “I think this is due in large part to the strong culture that we’ve developed in employing public health measures such as mask usage, social distancing and hand hygiene.”
7/6/20
A story in Bustle about how to self-quarantine when visiting another state has an interview with Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, who explained the difference between isolation and quarantine. “If you are infected, you undergo isolation. If you have had close contact (with people who have COVID) but are not established to be infected, you undergo quarantine,” Russo said. People in quarantine should stay home, separate themselves from others, monitor their health, and follow directions from their state or local health department.
7/3/20
An article in the Austin Chronicle discusses COVID-19 and how it’s affecting nursing homes. Bruce R. Troen, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, said: “Family members are often essential members of the clinical care team for older adults who are so frail, and especially those with dementia.” Troen also said COVID-19 can be kept out of nursing homes, with “intensive, appropriate and persistent procedures,” that include frequent testing of staff. “It can be done, but it requires a lot of resources and understanding and working with family members and the community,” he said.
7/3/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, was interviewed on why bars and restaurants are potential hot spots for COVID-19. Bars are “logarithmically worse” than restaurants, he said, noting that people in bars tend to be clustered together, are more likely to shout and move around, and gain a higher risk tolerance as they drink.
7/3/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, is quoted in stories discussing safety risks for COVID-19 at pools. “The pool itself isn’t a risk — it’s the people around the pool and the interactions around the pool,” he says.
7/2/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, appeared in MarketWatch to discuss safety issues with dining indoors at restaurants. “Whenever there’s a scenario where everyone can wear masks at all times the risk is lower,” Russo said. “When eating you physically can’t wear a mask but you can minimize that risk by popping it back on between bites.” States like New York that have been hit particularly hard by the virus, are also planning to reopen schools in the fall and “want to start off the school year with the best possible conditions,” Russo said. “It’s already going to be dicey going into the school year and getting elementary students to wear masks is going to be hard, but it’s an important activity that’s much different than going into a restaurant indoors.”
7/2/20
Anne B. Curtis, MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and the Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and chair of medicine, received the Heart Rhythm Society’s 2020 President’s Award for her substantial contribution to the society. She has held leadership roles in the organization for more than 25 years. Awardees accepted their honors on Heart Rhythm TV, the new flagship YouTube channel of the Heart Rhythm Society.
7/2/20
Nancy H. Nielsen, MD, PhD, clinical professor of medicine and senior associate dean for health policy, appeared on WBFO-FM during her regular segment since the pandemic began to discuss plans to return to school this fall. “It’s in everybody’s best interest for kids to be able to go to school, somehow,” she said.
7/2/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, is quoted in stories advising people attending cookouts this summer not to drink too much alcohol. “We’ve done it three times, once at our house, and twice at other people’s houses — always outdoors, always masks whenever possible, always maximal separation,” he says. “But as the evening progressed, people were creeping closer together and their inhibitions were breaking down. You really have to be on guard and alcohol leads to forgetting about following the rules.”
7/2/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, is quoted in stories discussing what activities are safe during the July 4th weekend.
7/2/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, is quoted in a story discussing New York State’s travel advisory and 14-day quarantine requirement.
7/2/20
Nancy H. Nielsen, MD, PhD, senior associate dean for health policy, is quoted extensively in articles on how to enjoy outdoor activities this summer while limiting your risk of catching and spreading COVID-19. “This is not a good time for family gatherings,” says Nielsen, adding that it’s something we will need to accept for many months to come. “Those may not be very safe until a safe and effective vaccine is available,” she says. 
7/1/20
Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, discussed eating in restaurants vs. takeout. “I think it’s important for people to realize that drive-through and order out is still the safest way to get food conveniently made by someone else,” Russo said.