Media Coverage

1/18/19
Anne B. Curtis, MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and chair of the Department of Medicine, discussed new technologies embedded in watches and other wearables shown at the annual Consumer Electronics Show. “I’ve made diagnoses on patients by looking at these [recordings] a few days later,” she said. “All you have to do is have the symptoms last long enough for a patient to turn on an app and make a 30-second recording.”
12/7/18
An article about why so many adults are reluctant to get a flu shot despite scientific evidence that shows the benefits of the vaccine interviews Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of infectious diseases. “Historically, adults do poorly with vaccines,” he said. “The other thing is that there is a fair amount of misinformation out there.” A related article about why people should get a flu shot every year features answers by local and national experts, including Russo. “Whenever you take any medication, there’s a small but finite chance you can have an adverse reaction to it,” he said, “but it’s very rare with the flu vaccine.”
11/27/18
A feature story on a website covering news in diabetes, covers the work of Paresh Dandona, MD, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of medicine and chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism, that has shown that drugs developed for Type 2 diabetes are also effective in treating patients with Type 1 diabetes. Dandona now is recruiting patients with Type 1 diabetes in a major Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation-funded clinical trial to further test these drugs.
11/26/18
An article about medical crowdfunding campaigns and the role that GoFundMe now plays in paying for health care interviews Nancy H. Nielsen, MD, PhD, senior associate dean for health policy. “The Affordable Care Act had three goals. Two of them got met,” she said, noting that one goal was to reform insurance abuses like denial of coverage to people with pre-existing conditions. Insuring as many people as possible was the second goal, she said, adding, “The third goal was to reduce costs. The third goal was not met.”
11/26/18
Nancy H. Nielsen, MD, PhD, senior associate dean for health policy, was quoted in an article about a plan by President Donald Trump that would gradually lower drug payment levels to levels based on international prices and set payment amounts for storing and handling drugs that are not tied to the drug’s cost. “This latest proposal is innovative, very good and long overdue. It’s a step in the right direction and it’s a smart model,” Nielsen said. “However, it’s going to face enormous opposition to come to fruition.”
11/5/18
Paresh Dandona, MD, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of medicine and chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism, was interviewed about his $1.6 million grant from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, in which he is enrolling Type 1 diabetes patients in a study of his “triple therapy” approach involving insulin plus two additional drugs that he has found help even out blood sugar control in Type 1 diabetics.
10/11/18
Peter Winkelstein, MD, executive director of the Institute for Healthcare Informatics and professor of pediatrics, and Timothy Murphy, MD, senior associate dean for clinical and translational research and SUNY Distinguished Professor of medicine, are interviewed about federally funded clinical trials conducted through UB. The number has seen a substantial uptick in the last three years, the result of a long-term effort to break down barriers within the university and a dedicated outreach effort in the community. “This substantial increase in research activity at UB is a result of all the changes this institution has made in a variety of areas to foster better health care in our community,” Murphy said. “Those efforts signaled UB’s strong institutional commitment to growing clinical research with a multimillion-dollar investment that allows us to fully support and perform world-class clinical research. Now they are paying off.”
10/1/18
An article about legislation that passed the House of Representatives on Sept. 28 that would likely allocate billions of dollars to fight the opioid crisis interviews Nancy H. Nielsen, MD, PhD, senior associate dean for health policy and a former president of the American Medical Association. “This bill has some really good points and is a great first step,” says Nielsen, clinical professor of medicine. “But it fails to create a funding source for infrastructure to treat future patients with substance use disorder. Opioids will not be the last drug crisis we have. Funding to establish treatment facilities and correctly train personnel for future epidemics is not in this bill.”
9/18/18
UB researchers have received a five-year, $3 million grant to apply the power of big data to enhance liver health in the region. Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine and co-principal investigator on the grant, said “clearly, it’s not an exaggeration to say that we are seeing a national crisis of liver disease and liver cancer.”
8/1/18
A Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences’ animal study may be one of the first to examine how low levels of vitamin D affect physical performance over the long term. Senior author on the study is Bruce R. Troen, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine. First author is Kenneth L. Seldeen, PhD, research assistant professor of medicine, who said, “The take-home message of this study is that while having low serum vitamin D for a month or even a year or two may not matter for a person, yet over several decades it may have clinical ramifications.”
8/1/18
Research by Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of infectious diseases, investigated the hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae, a rare but increasingly common strain of the pathogen that can infect completely healthy people, is resistant to all antibiotics and can cause blindness in one day and flesh-eating infections, brain abscesses and death in just a few days. “What’s increasingly concerning is the growing number of reports that describe strains of hypervirulent K. pneumoniae that are antimicrobial resistant,” he said. “A bug that's both hypervirulent and challenging to treat is a bad combination.”
7/27/18
While some issues are part of the normal aging process, geriatric syndromes aren’t, according to Anjeet K. Saini, MD, assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine. “When we get older, we’re at greater risk for disability that interfere with activities of daily living,” she said. “In geriatrics, activities of daily living are the core principles we need to survive. Once ADLs are decreased, we have more disabilities.”
6/7/18
A story on WBFO-FM about the benefits of the meditation practice of mindfulness interviews Archana Mishra, MD, clinical associate professor of medicine, who practices mindfulness. “Mindfulness is something that helps you become a better human being,” she said. “It reduces anxiety and stress and that’s been proven … by true scientific methods.”
6/1/18
An article on MedPage Today about women physicians who choose not to practice cardiology because of work-life balance issues and gender discrimination problems in the field includes an invited commentary by Anne B. Curtis, MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and chair of the Department of Medicine. “Having this factor be so important to career decisions today means that one needs to consider these issues in structuring positions in order to attract the best people,” Curtis said.
5/18/18
An article in Business First reports that the Department of Medicine in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, in conjunction with Evergreen Health, is participating in a multicenter clinical trial investigating the safety and efficacy of a regimen to treat HIV that is administered in monthly injections. Alyssa S. Shon, MD, clinical assistant professor of medicine, is principal investigator on the trial.