Media Coverage

12/6/17
The Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences has begun its move downtown, which is being done in several phases. “It’s a thoughtful, coordinated move,” said Michael E. Cain, MD, vice president of health sciences and dean of the medical school. “We designed this move to take several months on purpose. It’s a complex move and we can’t interrupt classes once they’ve started.”
11/6/17
Qidni Labs, winner of the 43North competition in October 2017, reports it is working to raise $2.5 million to continue development of the startup’s nano-filters, which function like a kidney, and notes the company will open an office in Buffalo and collaborate with the Division of Nephrology within the Department of Medicine in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.
11/3/17
Eric Ten Brock, MD, professor of medicine, speaks about the changes to a person’s health that daylight savings time can bring about. “There have been studies that demonstrate increased risk of strokes and acute myocardial infarction that day and the next day,” says Ten Brock, who specializes in sleep medicine. "Over 40 percent of adults in this country are chronically sleep-deprived. And to lose one more hour is sort of a stress test and can exacerbate that problem so that people are often more tired.” The biannual time changes have also been liked to an increased risk of depression and mood changes.
11/3/17
An article about New York State’s 10 Centers of Excellence for Alzheimer’s Disease, including the Western New York center based at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, interviews Bruce R. Troen, MD, center co-director and professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, and Kinga Szigeti, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and center co-director.
9/25/17
Research by Paresh Dandona, MD, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of medicine and chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism, shows that a majority of patients with type 1 diabetes did significantly better at controlling blood sugar when they used insulin and a medicine for type 2 diabetes. “It can save a lot of lives,” he said. “It can reduce complications like eye disease, blindness, kidney disease and failure. Type 1 is really a disaster and, overall, not a disease you want to have.”
9/22/17
Research by Paresh Dandona, MD, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of medicine and chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism, shows that patients with type 1 diabetes who were treated with a type 2 diabetes drug had a significant decline in their blood sugar levels. “There remains a high unmet medical need in helping treat the millions of patients living with type 1 diabetes while managing the complications associated with the disease,” he said. “It is critical that we continue to advance clinical research with newer and novel therapies.”
9/19/17
Researchers at Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences have identified a new way to predict which Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVR) patients may be at higher risk for hospital readmission. The article appears in “Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team.” Aishwarya Bhardwaj, MD, internal medicine resident, is first author. Tharmathai Ramanan, MD, clinical cardiovascular disease fellow, is first co-author. Vijay S. Iyer, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine, is principal investigator.
9/13/17
An article about an outbreak of human Campylobacter infections that have been linked to puppies sold through a national pet store chain quotes Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of infectious diseases. Raw milk is also a potential source of the infection, which is why it’s better to drink pasteurized milk, he said.
9/8/17
An article on the emergence of hypervirulent, multidrug-resistant and highly transmissible strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae quotes Thomas A. Russo, MD, professor of medicine and chief of infectious diseases. "In this case it looks like the virulence factors went from the hypervirulent strains into an extensively drug-resistant strain," he said. "This is exactly what we were concerned about, and we thought would have a high likelihood of coming to fruition."
8/30/17
Bruce R. Troen, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, and Kenneth L. Seldeen, PhD, research assistant professor of medicine, have concluded a preclinical study that showed that brief periods of intense physical activity can be safely administered at an advanced age, and that this kind of activity has the potential to reverse frailty. “We know that being frail or being at risk for becoming frail puts people at increased risk of dying and comorbidity,” Troen said. “These results show that it’s possible that high-intensity interval training can help enhance quality of life and capacity to be healthy.”
8/17/17
Ramon E. Rivera, MD, assistant professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, was interviewed about possible contamination of endoscopes used in colonoscopies performed at the Veterans Administration hospital in Buffalo. “The worst thing that could come out of this,” Rivera said, “would be for patients sitting at home saying ‘You know what? I won’t get my colonoscopy.’”
8/15/17
A new study has found that heart failure patients who took aspirin daily were not at higher risk of being hospitalized for, or dying from, heart failure. Susan Graham, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, who worked on the study, said heart patients — and older adults in general — are often taking many prescription drugs at any given time. “That speaks to the importance of studying potential drug interactions,” she said. “We have to stay on our toes to make sure that we’re doing the right thing.”
8/14/17
Umesh Sharma, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine, has received a five-year, $1 million grant to study a protein that, in excessive amounts, during a heart attack promotes the formation of fibrous tissue in the heart.
8/11/17
An article reports on research being conducted by Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, and two student researchers to find out if telemedicine can improve hepatitis C treatment for patients who take methadone and, if so, how it can work best. “This is a population that not only has been excluded from medical care but also from research,” Talal said.
8/9/17
Umesh Sharma, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine, has received a grant of $1 million from the National Institutes of Health to continue work on a study involving heart failure after a heart attack.