Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine

7/10/20
Emergency medicine researchers — including Brian Clemency, DO — have launched a study to see if a steroid medication typically used to treat asthma can help patients with COVID-19. “Some people with viruses or other illnesses feel better sooner, faster with these kinds of medicines, so our hope in this case is that it will be helpful too,” says Clemency, associate professor of emergency medicine. Sanjay Sethi, MD — professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine — helped Clemency set up the study in the region.
6/18/20
There is some excitement among doctors treating COVID-19 because new medical research has found that a corticosteroid called dexamethasone can be used to treat patients who are breathing through a ventilator. Researchers working out of Oxford University say the drug reduced deaths by up to one-third for those with respiratory problems from the virus. “Is it grade A evidence? No. But is it grade B evidence? Yes. So we are kind of excited that we have two choices now," says Sanjay Sethi, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine. He notes that this is not a major cure but may become a leading drug in the COVID-19 war, along with the antiviral remdesivir.
5/16/20
Manoj J. Mammen, MD, associate professor of medicine and a critical care physician at Buffalo General Medical Center, is quoted in an article about an effort among WNY hospitals to use antibodies to treat some COVID-19 patients.
5/8/20
Researchers — including Sanjay Sethi, MD; Ruogang Zhao, PhD; Albert H. Titus, PhD; and Chi Zhou, PhD — are developing a system that has the potential to turn resuscitators into devices that, like mechanical ventilators, help patients breathe without the assistance of another person. Sethi is a professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine; Zhao is an associate professor of biomedical engineering; Titus is a professor and chair of biomedical engineering; and Zhou is an associate professor in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.
5/5/20
The Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences has launched the local program of the National COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Project. Researchers put out the call for people who have recovered from COVID-19. Experts believe if plasma from these survivors is administered to a currently infected person, these antibodies could help aid in recovery. “Those antibodies can hopefully control the virus, and those are in the plasma, so before we had antibiotics these things were tried and succeeded in certain situations,” says Sanjay Sethi, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine. Sethi is coordinating the program with Timothy F. Murphy, MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of medicine and director of UB’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute.
4/23/20
A story on a program in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences to treat COVID-19 patients with the plasma of those who have recovered from the disease said that UB has received interest from more than 300 potential donors. The story quotes Sanjay Sethi, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, who said that the treatment will take some time before it’s known if it is effective in patients.
4/22/20
The state health department has been testing people for COVID-19 to get a better picture of how many people have been infected by the virus. “This is a challenging time, but then you have to step up to the challenge, and that’s what we’ve been trying to do,” says Sanjay Sethi, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine. Sethi explains that antibodies found in the blood are the natural way our bodies fight the virus. “They’re supposed to neutralize or kill the virus, so that’s the normal response or the way the body deals with an infection, and theoretically those antibodies should be able to protect you or prevent reinfection,” he says.
4/8/20
Jamie N. Nadler, MD, clinical assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine and a Buffalo General Medical Center critical care physician, is quoted in a story on experimental treatments for COVID-19. Some experimental treatments will start with critically ill patients until doctors know more about their effectiveness. “If we’re finding them successful, then we want to start rolling them out to more moderately ill patients to prevent their decline sooner,” Nadler said.
3/25/20
A Buffalo News story on New York State’s need for ventilators interviews Sanjay Sethi, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, who explained what ventilators do. “They assist the lungs to get air in and out. You can control the volume of air, what rate it goes in, how much oxygen you add to it,” Sethi said.
3/23/20
Sanjay Sethi, MD, answers COVID-19-related questions about testing, the measures medical professionals are taking to protect themselves while treating COVID-19 patients, and the length of the contagious period. He also provides insight into whether it’s helpful to have an up-to-date pneumonia vaccine and whether smoking has an effect on the body’s ability to fight the virus. Sethi is a professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine.
12/9/19
Sanjay Sethi, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, is quoted in an article about taking prednisone. “People who have conditions aggravated by the side effects of prednisone may be at risk,” he said. “This includes people with diabetes, since prednisone can increase blood sugar levels, and mood disorders, since the drug can cause difficulty sleeping, irritability and, rarely, psychosis.”
11/26/19
A story on legislation restricting the sale of flavored vaping products quotes Sanjay Sethi, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine. Some retailers claim the regulation will in essence restrict the sale of an effective smoking-cessation method, resulting in more people smoking traditional cigarettes, but Sethi says such a claim may not be true. “Vaping tobacco has been shown to lead to smoking. Therefore, the idea that increased vaping regulation will lead to more smoking may not be true,” he said.
10/21/19
MD Magazine published a question-and-answer interview with Sanjay Sethi, MD, professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, about the potential benefits of aclidinium bromide in patients with COPD.
10/4/19
In stories about vaping-related illnesses, Sanjay Sethi, MD, professor of medicine and chair of pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine, said these illnesses are showing up in people, for the most part, who are vaping marijuana and black market products. “It can be really challenging to support these patients and find the right, specific treatment for them,” he said.