Cardiovascular Medicine

9/30/19
Stories about new research that found that the risks outweigh the benefits for people who are taking low-dose aspirin to prevent a heart attack or stroke interviews John M. Canty Jr., SUNY Distinguished Professor and Albert and Elizabeth Rekate Professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. “No one under the age of 40 should be on aspirin unless there are very unique circumstances,” Canty said.
7/19/19
Vijay S. Iyer, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, was interviewed for a story about the life-changing impact that transcatheter aortic valve replacement can have for patients with heart disease. “As people get older, valve diseases are pretty common, and we have an aging population,” he said, adding that before 2011, half of those with severe aortic stenosis — or narrowing — weren’t getting treated because the condition is typically a disease of the elderly and many had other serious health conditions that made open chest surgery too risky”
5/28/19
A story about $2.4 million in funding for studies at Buffalo’s VA Medical Center reports Jennifer K. Lang, MD, assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, will receive $1.4 million to study heart failure and myocardial infarction; and Bruce R. Troen, MD, professor of medicine and chief of geriatrics and palliative medicine, will receive $200,000 to study the impact of high-intensity interval training on older adults.
5/23/19
An article about three studies that showed that implantable cardiac devices are underused interviews Anne B. Curtis, MD, Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and chair and SUNY Distinguished Professor in the Department of Medicine. “Device usage across both gender and race was strikingly low, despite medical records documenting patient eligibility for the therapy. The breadth of practice type, from academic medical centers to community hospitals, along with the sheer number of patients highlight the seriousness of the challenge,” she said.
4/25/19
A team of UB biomedical engineers, cardiovascular specialists and neurosurgeons are working together to create and use custom-made models of the human vascular system. “We can take the same anatomy that we find in a patient, 3D print it and then perform these procedures whether to test a new device, test a new strategy or devise a treatment strategy for a particular patient,” said Adnan Siddiqui, MD, PhD, professor of neurosurgery. Vijay S. Iyer, MD, PhD, clinical associate professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, was also interviewed.
1/18/19
Anne B. Curtis, MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and chair of the Department of Medicine, discussed new technologies embedded in watches and other wearables shown at the annual Consumer Electronics Show. “I’ve made diagnoses on patients by looking at these [recordings] a few days later,” she said. “All you have to do is have the symptoms last long enough for a patient to turn on an app and make a 30-second recording.”
11/15/18
Anne B. Curtis, MD, Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and chair of medicine, was selected as a panelist on the American College of Cardiology Hour With Dr. Valentin Fuster that was released during the 2018 American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. Curtis joined Fuster and three other cardiologists to share their perspectives on the most significant science released during the conference.
10/26/18
Anne B. Curtis, MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and chair of the Department of Medicine, is the subject of a Q&A interview. “I passionately believe we need to come together as a cohesive group. We need to be a strong health care system here in Western New York because we have competition all around us. We have the Cleveland Clinic, Rochester and Pittsburgh. We need to do an excellent job in terms of all the basics of good, quality patient care and be up to whatever the latest treatments are,” she said.
7/23/18
New British research suggests that aspirin dosages to help prevent stroke and heart attack should be determined by a person’s weight and not a one-size-fits-all approach. Anne B. Curtis, MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and chair of medicine said “it makes a lot of intuitive sense that if you have somebody who is much larger that they might need (a higher dosage).”
6/1/18
An article on MedPage Today about women physicians who choose not to practice cardiology because of work-life balance issues and gender discrimination problems in the field includes an invited commentary by Anne B. Curtis, MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and chair of the Department of Medicine. “Having this factor be so important to career decisions today means that one needs to consider these issues in structuring positions in order to attract the best people,” Curtis said.
5/25/18
An article about the rapid revolution of technology-aided care that is available through remote patient monitoring interviews Anne B. Curtis, MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and chair of medicine; Ajay Chaudhuri, MD, clinical director of medicine and director of the endocrinology, metabolism and diabetes fellowship program; and Andrew H. Talal, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition; about the devices that can reduce patients’ trips to the doctor’s office.
5/16/18
An article about questions over whether it was a broken heart that caused the hospitalization of former President George H.W. Bush just a day after the funeral of his wife, Barbara, interviews Anne B. Curtis, MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and chair of medicine. The sudden loss of a spouse, child or parent “releases an outpouring from the sympathetic nervous system, the fight-or-flight response, which is what seems to damage the heart in broken-heart syndrome,” she said. “The heart rate goes up sharply, blood pressure goes up. This is why people can also have a stroke in situations like this.” 
3/15/18
After a record snowstorm dumped a foot or more of snow across Western New York, articles reported tips from John M. Canty, Jr., MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor, Albert and Elizabeth Rekate Professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, who said that shoveling “is heavy exercise” and warned that shoveling can cause sudden stress on a person’s body, especially because it is performed in the cold. 
1/31/18
News articles report that Cytocybernetics, a UB spinoff co-founded by two Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences faculty, has been awarded $1.5 million by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which will support hiring and development. The company was founded by Glenna C. Bett, PhD, vice chair for research and associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and Randall L. Rasmusson, PhD, professor of physiology and biophysics.
12/28/17
Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences faculty members weighed in on how to stay healthy in the new year in an article on resolutions. Anne B. Curtis, MD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and Chair of Medicine, said: “If you find you have been too sedentary, figure out when you can fit in 10 minutes of walking to start.” Priyanka Patnaik, MD, medical director at UBMD Family Medicine at Conventus and a clinical assistant professor of family medicine, suggested taking an hour a day “to relax and let go of all the stress of work, maybe spend some time meditating or doing yoga.”