Research Highlights

Our research scientists and doctors have made important and internationally recognized contributions to medical science, including patents, discoveries and treatment advances.


The National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS) has funded two separate projects led by researchers in the departments of Neurology and Pharmacology and Toxicology.


Pinaki Sarder, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and anatomical sciences, has received a grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases’ Diabetic Complications Consortium to study the computational imaging of renal structures for diagnosing diabetic nephropathy.


A team of researchers led by Kwang W. Oh, PhD, associate professor of biomedical engineering and electrical engineering, has fabricated a chip that uses two different types of force — capillary- and vacuum-driven — to manipulate how fluids travel in micro- and nanosized channels.


Cytocybernetics, a UB spinoff co-founded by two Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences faculty members, has been awarded $1.5 million by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop an enhanced version of a device it created that integrates electronics with heart muscle cells to test how new drugs affect the heart’s electrical activity.


A new review paper led by Stephanie Anzman-Frasca, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics, suggests varied diets and persistence in exposing infants and children to healthy foods is key to promoting healthy eating behaviors.


University at Buffalo spinoff POP Biotechnologies Inc. (POP BIO) ended 2017 on a high note with a flurry of activity, including reaching research agreements with two international pharmaceutical companies.


A newly patented technology developed as a collaboration in the departments of Biomedical Engineering, Orthopaedics, and Microbiology and Immunology is at the heart of an Office of Naval Research (ONR) grant focused on preventing and treating orthopaedic implant-related infections.


A global study led by Paresh Dandona, MD, PhD, found a majority of patients with Type 1 diabetes who were treated with dapagliflozin, a Type 2 diabetes medicine, had a significant decline in their blood sugar levels.


Researchers in the Department of Medicine have published a study that identifies a new way to predict which patients may be at a higher risk for heart failure after undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVR).

An observational study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association is part of a growing body of evidence suggesting that long periods of rest may not help concussion patients recover, according to UB researchers.