Media Coverage

9/18/18
Research by Craig T. Werner, a postdoctoral fellow in pharmacology and toxicology, and David Dietz, PhD, professor and chair of pharmaoclogy and toxicology, shows that a class of proteins, for the first time, been shown to be effective in reducing relapse, or drug-seeking behaviors, in a preclinical study. "One of the greatest challenges with addiction is the persistent vulnerability to relapse," Werner said.
9/12/18
An article reports on research by Caroline E. Bass, PhD, assistant professor of pharmacology and toxicology, that used optogenetics to treat binge drinking in mice. “By stimulating certain dopamine neurons in a precise pattern, resulting in low but prolonged levels of dopamine release, we could prevent the rats from binging. The rats just flat out stopped drinking,” she said.
8/30/18
An article in the Buffalo News told about David Dietz, PhD, associate professor, being appointed chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Dietz has developed a research program focused on how susceptible individuals are to drug abuse and relapse.
8/27/18
An article co-authored by David Dietz, PhD, associate professor and chair, Craig T. Werner, PhD, a postdoctoral associate, and Jennifer A. Martin, a doctoral student, all in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, tells about high-profile celebrities who have relapsed into addiction and looks at the painful reality of treating the illness. “Addiction — and relapse — are not the result of a lack of effort, but rather the known symptoms of both a medical and psychosocial problem. In this context, relapse is not indicative of a personal failure but rather a systemic one. Our current treatment regimens still too often fail to prevent relapses because they are still struggling to treat the underlying disease,” they write.
8/15/18
Research by Fraser J. Sim, PhD, associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology has found that a receptor called muscarinic type 3 (M3R), a key regulator of the remyelination process, is a promising drug target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. “This work establishes that M3R has a functional role and if blocked, could improve myelin repair,” he said. “It better positions the field for clinical trials that will be aimed at blocking these receptors in MS patients.”
2/21/18
Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences researchers are working on ways to improve multiple sclerosis patients’ cognitive function and to repair damage to the myelin coating that protects nerve cells. The studies are being led by Janet L. Shucard, PhD, associate professor of clinical neurology, and Fraser J. Sim, PhD, associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology.
8/15/17
Research by Fraser J. Sim, PhD, associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology, successfully tested a method for determining how relevant to the human disease findings are from mouse models. “This is an important resource for the field as it allows us to compare human and rodent cells, and provides a point of reference to understand whether or not gene expression patterns are conserved between species,” he said.
8/15/17
A new study has identified a gene that plays a central role in either protecting from stress or contributing to depression, depending on its level of activity in a part of the brain associated with motivation, pleasure and reward-seeking. David Dietz, PhD, associate professor and interim chair of pharmacology and toxicology, said little was known previously about the biological basis of depression in the brain. “We’re starting to really get an idea of what does the depressed brain look like,” he said. “When you put the whole puzzle together, you see where the problem is…. For the first time this is one of those bigger pieces you can slide into the jigsaw puzzle.”
5/25/17
Harvey A. Berman, PhD, associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology, discusses Myers v. Schneiderman, a renewed attempt to legalize physician-assisted suicide in New York. He emphasizes that since euthanasia’s legalization in the Netherlands and Belgium, it has “devolved from assisted death only for the terminally ill to include those who are chronically ill, from those with physical illness to those with psychological illness, from adults to children and ultimately to those who are simply ‘tired of living.’”
5/23/17
Exposure to chemicals that are found in insecticides can affect sleeping patterns and lead to a higher risk of diabetes, according to a study by senior author Margarita L. Dubocovich, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology.
5/11/17
UB has received a $2.3 million grant renewal from the National Institutes of Health to provide funding to train 20 new biomedical and behavioral scientists from underrepresented groups between now and 2021. “The theme is to be a catalyst. We are creating a self-propagating pipeline. We are developing leaders,” said Rajendram Rajnarayanan, PhD, assistant professor of pharmacology and toxicology.
4/18/17
An article in the journal Sleep Review reports on UB research that showed that synthetic chemicals commonly found in insecticides and garden products bind to the receptors that govern people’s biological clocks, adversely affecting melatonin receptor signaling and creating a higher risk for metabolic diseases such as diabetes, and quotes Margarita L. Dubocovich, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor of pharmacology and toxicology.
3/1/17
Recent research by Margarita L. Dubocovich, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology; Rajendram Rajnarayanan, PhD, assistant professor of pharmacology and toxicology; and former graduate student Marina Popovska-Gorevski, on how insecticides increase the risk of type 2 diabetes by disrupting circadian rhythms is featured  as a “Paper of the Month” on the website of the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, a research institute of the National Institutes of Health.
2/27/17
A new UB study shows that exposure to synthetic chemicals commonly found in insecticides and garden products may adversely affect melatonin receptor signaling, creating a higher risk for metabolic diseases such as diabetes.
2/9/17
Rajendram Rajnarayanan, PhD, assistant professor of pharmacology and toxicology, was featured in an AAAS Science Update podcast about research he and UB colleagues did showing how they are using computational methods to study the long-term health effects of chemical pesticides on families.
12/9/16
A study by researchers in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology finds exercise, coupled with methamphetamine, may help recovery of those addicted to the drug and increase their odds of avoiding relapse. Margarita L. Dubocovich, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and chair of pharmacology and toxicology, is senior author. Randall Hudson, PhD, research professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics, is a co-author.
12/8/16
Along with his colleagues, Pablo M. Paez, PhD — assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and research scientist with the Hunter James Kelly Research Institute — has identified a critical step in myelination after birth that has significance for treating neurodegenerative diseases.
11/16/16
An article about a new study that found that exercise along with controlled intake of methamphetamine prior to withdrawal could be a powerful new tool to treat meth addiction quotes Margarita L. Dubocovich, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor and chair of pharmacology and toxicology, who said meth users live in a state akin to constant jet-lag.
10/30/16
Peter G. Bradford, PhD, associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology and instructor of dental pharmacology, had comments published in the October 2016 issue of the ASDA News (American Student Dental Association News) on the legalization of medical and recreational marijuana and on establishing standards of how dental specialists must educate their patients about the complexities of cannabis use.

"It is the obligation of the dental specialist to educate patients even with potentially difficult subjects,” he said. “If a patient does speak of cannabis use, it is important that all dental professionals acknowledge in a non-judgmental manner that a patient has disclosed sensitive information about their life regarding the use of a controlled substance."
10/17/16
James R. Olson, PhD, professor of pharmacology and toxicology, is a co-investigator on a UB study to analyze the impact of emissions from the Tonawanda Coke plant on the health of workers and area residents.