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Media Coverage

3/6/17
Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul visited Glenna C. Bett, PhD, and Kate Rittenhouse-Olson, PhD, to celebrate the United Nation’s Women’s Entrepreneurship Day. Bett’s company has developed a system that screens drugs in their early development stages to determine whether they may cause deadly side effects. Olson’s company is developing an antibody that shows promise as a weapon against cancer cells. 
3/1/17
An article about the role UB plays in the growth of biomedical companies emerging in downtown Buffalo looks at some of the UB-affiliated companies, including Athenex and For-Robin, and notes that Steven D. Schwaitzberg, MD, chair of the Department of Surgery, recently said Buffalo looks like Boston in the late 1980s just before it became an international biomedical powerhouse.
4/22/16
A business feature story highlighting life sciences and high-tech companies throughout the region, looks at For-Robin, a drug company founded by Kate Rittenhouse-Olson, PhD, professor of biotechnical and clinical laboratory sciences, that has patented an antibody that attaches itself to cancer cells to kill them and block their spread to other parts of the body.
3/5/16
An article about the need for thousands of skilled workers to fill the biotech jobs in the Buffalo Niagara region quotes Kate Rittenhouse-Olson, PhD, professor of biotechnical and clinical laboratory sciences, and the founder of the start-up company, For-Robin Inc., which is developing a cancer treatment.
9/3/15
A growing number of successful University at Buffalo spinoff companies are contributing to the recent biotechnology boom in Buffalo. For-Robin, founded in 2012 by Kate Rittenhouse-Olson, PhD, professor of biotechnology, received a $2 million federal grant to further test its breast cancer therapy. Empire Genomics, founded in 2007 by Norma Nowak, PhD, professor of biochemistry, is based off research done at UB and offers a variety of genomic tests that detect cancer.
7/24/15
For-Robin, founded by Kate Rittenhouse-Olson, PhD, professor of biotechnology, has been awarded $2 million from the National Cancer Institute to support promising research on a treatment for various types of cancers, including breast cancer.
6/3/15
UB Spin-off business For-Robin, founded by Kate Rittenhouse-Olson, PhD, professor and director of the biotechnology program, is one of six businesses accepted into the Start-up NY program through the University at Buffalo. For-Robin will locate to Sherman Hall on campus, create two new jobs and invest $5,000. 
10/6/14
The University at Buffalo will receive a grant that helps further genomics and genetics education in high schools across Western New York. The program, lead by Stephen T. Koury, PhD, “will provide hundreds of high school students with the skills they need to pursue a career in life sciences,” says Michael E. Cain, MD, vice president for health sciences and dean, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. 
11/22/13
Job prospects are bright — with average starting salaries of $50,000 — for those with undergraduate degrees from UB’s medical technology program.
10/7/13
Through her startup firm, University at Buffalo researcher Kate Rittenhouse-Olson, PhD, professor of biotechnical and clinical laboratory sciences, is turning a mouse antibody she created into a promising cancer-fighting therapy for humans.
8/4/13
University at Buffalo researcher Kate Rittenhouse-Olson, PhD, professor of biotechnical and clinical laboratory sciences, is working on a possible cancer-fighting therapy for humans; the antibody is almost ready for human trials.
6/6/13
According to a study led by UB researchers, eating four servings of low-fat dairy per day improves a marker of insulin resistance but has no negative effect on weight or other health measures.
6/6/13
University at Buffalo biochemist Richard W. Browne, PhD, associate professor of biotechnical and clinical laboratory sciences, is a co-author on research revealing that higher levels of cholesterol reduce couples' chances of conceiving a healthy embryo.
2/22/13
Along with a colleague in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Alexander N. Cartwright, PhD, of biomedical engineering, has developed an experimental polymerized light filtering system. Kate Rittenhouse-Olson, PhD, of biotechnical and clinical laboratory sciences, has been working for 20 years on a tumor suppressor that could revolutionize breast cancer therapy. Anders P. Hakansson, PhD, of microbiology and immunology, is leading work on the antibiotic applications of a protein lipid complex in breast milk.